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My intention is to write a byte[] to a file. Code snippet is below:

byte[] stream = { 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 };

for (int i = 0; i < 2; i++)
{
    FileStream aCmdFileStream = new FileStream(@"c:\binarydata.txt", FileMode.Append, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.None);
    StreamWriter aStreamWriter = new StreamWriter(aCmdFileStream);

    for (int ii = 0; ii < stream.Length; ii++)
    {
        aStreamWriter.Write(stream[ii]);
        aStreamWriter.WriteLine(); 
        aStreamWriter.BaseStream.Write(stream,0,stream.Length);
    }

    aStreamWriter.Close();
}

Output of this code snippet

(<
(<
(<
(<
(<10
20
30
40
60

(<
(<
(<
(<
(<10
20
30
40
60

When StreamWriter.Write() is used it dumps the values which are stored in array. But StreamWriter.BaseStream.Write(byte[],int offset, int length), the values are totally different. What is the reason for this?

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I would suggest you not to use classes that are meant for working with text (like StreamWriter) to work with binary data. –  svick Jan 11 '12 at 11:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is because StreamWriter is a TextWriter and converts the bytes to Text (string representation).

And using BaseStream.Write(byte[] data, ...) directly writes the bytes without any conversion.

But you are using the 2 methods interleaved, I guess some overwriting is happening too. Note that you should use one or the other, not both.

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Also worth mentioning that the StreamWriter is buffering (not expecting anyone to directly access the BaseStream), which is why the numbers are appearing after the other text. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 11 '12 at 11:42
    
just curious to know why such special characters are generated, bytes means a value from 0 to 255. –  Raghav55 Jan 11 '12 at 11:44
    
Re the 'special chars' - what you see depends on the viewer used and what encoding is used/deduced. –  Henk Holterman Jan 11 '12 at 12:25

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