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I'm pretty excitet about all the new stuff coming up in Windows 8, but at the same time a bit worried about how and if I can continue use the code and custom components I have already built up using .NET and C# during my time as a Windows dev. I've got some general mixed questions about this. Hope you don't mind I'm putting them together in one post:

  • Will Windows 8 Store be for both metro-style apps and regular WPF-desktop apps? Including pushing updates and making apps available for company employees?

  • Will the new App Contract-thingy also be available for WPF-apps? And is AppContract based on WCF-services with perhaps UDP-discovery on the network? Can I make my own contracts between my own apps using the App Contract framework?

  • I'm not particularly worried about if WPF will be ditched or not. I can live without it. The thing that worries me is if I still can write presentation and business-layer code in C# and use it as a backend for my apps, no matter what UI-framework I'll be using, HTML, Silverlight, WPF or what have you. If I'm still able to write logic in C# and present it using X UI-framework, I'm a happy developer. I've heard I can access the .NET-framework from JavaScript. But what about custom assemblies?

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"Will Windows 8 Store be for both metro-style apps and regular WPF-desktop apps? Including pushing updates and making apps available for company employees" I think you will be able to advertise them, but cannot use whole "metro" ecosystem. –  lukas Jan 13 '12 at 15:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It has been announced that non-Metro apps can appear in the store but the store will just link to the publisher's website - not actually manage the sale/install/DRM/etc stuff.

What's been announced so far is that the contracts are only for Metro apps but I'd be shocked if this doesn't change. It would be crazy for Microsoft not to allow desktop apps to, for example, add commands to the Settings charm, support PlayTo or printing through the Devices charm, or act as Share sources. We'll have to wait and see where they draw the line on what desktop apps can/can't do.

Sharing code between Metro and non-Metro apps is going to be very difficult. A lot of the core concepts and conventions are the same but even basic stuff like file I/O rely on a totally new API. There aren't a ton of interesting things you can do with in code that will work on both sides of the fence. Best bet would be to define interfaces for your business layer stuff and then use dependecy injection to dynamically select desktop vs. winrt implementations at runtime

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It is my opinion that Microsoft are becoming more and more like Apple. And if that is the case, I think it is safe to say that you can forget about "adding commands to the Settings charm, support PlayTo or printing through the Devices charm, or act as Share sources", unfortunately. –  Tommy Feb 12 '13 at 12:41
  • Store: there is no final information but as far as I understood it, it's for metro style applications only

  • The app contracts are a metro thing. I know a code snippet that documents usage from desktop apps (eg http://www.heise.de/developer/artikel/WinRT-in-klassischen-NET-Anwendungen-nutzen-1366039.html (sorry, German)), but I do not know if it will have support from Microsoft

  • WinRT compiles libraries to WinRT components. You might be able to reuse code and compile them to a component as long as you're not using a namespace that isn't available for WinRT

This question is heavy on guessing as there is no official beta available. And even then we can't be absolutely sure...

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