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Hi I have many directories which have blank space in their names.I have some scripts to be run on them. Here is an example script

#!/bin/bash
docid='/home/deel/PDF/rant/spr 2008 Shree rose Visheshank'
p=1
while [ $p -lt 117 ]; do
cp $docid/$p.pdf ./
p=$p+1
done

Upon executing the above script I get following errors

cp: cannot stat `/home/deel/PDF/rant/spr': No such file or directory
cp: cannot stat `2008': No such file or directory
cp: cannot stat `Shree': No such file or directory
cp: cannot stat `rose': No such file or directory
cp: cannot stat `Visheshank/1.pdf': No such file or directory
./d2.sh: line 5: [: 1+1: integer expression expected

I have tried using double quotes "" but the results are same. What changes should I do?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This line:

cp $docid/$p.pdf ./

should read:

cp "$docid/$p.pdf" ./

Example:

$ a='abc def'
$ ls $a
ls: abc: No such file or directory
ls: def: No such file or directory
$ ls "$a"
ls: abc def: No such file or directory

And arithmetic goes like:

p=$[p+1]

Example:

$ p=1
$ q=$[p+1]
$ echo $p $q
1 2
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thanks for making this clear.What exactly is the reason that it is working the way you explained? –  Registered User Jan 11 '12 at 12:09
    
p=$[p+1] is a bashism. You can do arithmetic more portably with $(( p += 1 )) and even more portably using eval. ("more portably" means posix, "even more portably" means should work in shells from the 70s) –  William Pursell Jan 11 '12 at 13:21
    
@RegisteredUser: $a is expanded to abc def, so ls $a expands to ls abc def, i.e. 2 arguments. ls "$a" expands to ls "abc def", i.e. 1 argument. –  mvds Jan 11 '12 at 13:34
    
The p=$[p+1] form is deprecated. Use (( p++ )) instead. –  Dennis Williamson Jan 11 '12 at 17:23
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You need to quote the name containing spaces with double quotes. Moreover, p=$p+1 does not do what you expect. Here is the corrected loop:

for p in `seq 116`; do
    cp "$docid/$p.pdf" ./
done
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thanks for the seq tip. –  Registered User Jan 11 '12 at 12:08
1  
{1..116} could replace the seq command or perhaps seq -f"%03g" 116 (bearing in mind you'll probably want to sort them sooner or later). –  potong Jan 11 '12 at 12:19
1  
@potong: I know this question is tagged bash, but I usually prefer to remember the POSIX-compatible variants instead of the bash-specific extensions. seq -f"%03g" 116 is more easily written seq -w 116, but both of those won't help much -- the OP obviously wants to copy files named 1.pdf to 116.pdf. –  Sven Marnach Jan 11 '12 at 12:24
    
@pontong this is even better thanks for the sorting tip.Yes I do want that. –  Registered User Jan 11 '12 at 12:25
    
@sven seq is hardly portable (it doesn't even exist on OSX) –  William Pursell Jan 11 '12 at 13:19
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