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I frequenty have to do something like this,

    if(condition1) {
        if {condition2) { //this condition is repeated again below
          //dosomething here 1 code 1
        }
        else{
           //dosomething here 2 code 2
        }
    }
    else {
       if {condition2) { //same if condition as above 
             //dosomething here 3 code 3
       }
       else{
             //dosomething here 4 code 4
       }
    }

Basically, only checking for if(condition2) is repeated in both case, and dosomething is different in all 4 places i.e code1, code2, code3, code4 are all different code.

So, is there anyway to make it compact and readable Or this is fine ?

Thanks.

After going through edits and looking at answers, I wonder now if this question even makes sense at all. I feel stupid now.

share|improve this question
1  
Um... if you have the same code in both branches why do you need the first if? –  Tudor Jan 11 '12 at 12:39
    
Sorry, if not clear, I updated question now. Basically I was checking for same condition2 in two places, so I was thinking there most be some way to avoid double checking. –  newcoderintown Jan 11 '12 at 12:45
1  
Is else part of condition2 in both cases same? –  Harry Joy Jan 11 '12 at 12:46
    
Do you actually have code in those else statements (if not why are they even there?). The answer to this does have a large impact on what optimisations can be made... –  Chris Jan 11 '12 at 12:49
    
Honestly, I can't see how any of the proposed alternatives are clearer than the original code. But that doesn't mean it's a stupid question. I've wondered this before because I occasionally see code written like this. –  Cody Gray Jan 12 '12 at 9:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For your specific case, the best alternative is:

NO LONGER APPLIES - valid for the case where dosomething here 1 was the same with dosomething here 3

if ( c2 )
{
}
else if ( c1 )
{
}
else
{
}

For less simple cases, you can group conditions together:

if ( c1 && c2 )
{
} 
else if ( c1 && !c2 )
{
} 
else if ( !c1 && c2 )
{
} 
else if ( !c1 && !c2 )
{
}

although I don't know if this is more readable.

If more conditions are necessary, I've seen code like this:

do {
   if (c1)
   {
      //....
      break;
   }
   if (c2)
   {
      //....
      break;
   }
   //.....
} while (false);
share|improve this answer
1  
I don't know if the question changed but your first example doesn't seem to be the same thing... If c2 is true then yours ignores the state of c1 which the original post doesn't. Edit/Note: I hadn't seen the latest update with code in the else blocks in which case it definitely doesn't match. ;-) –  Chris Jan 11 '12 at 12:52
    
@Chris the question did change, do something 1 & 3 were the same in the original. –  Luchian Grigore Jan 11 '12 at 12:53
    
@Chris: Yes the question get changed. You can see the edits for more understanding. –  Harry Joy Jan 11 '12 at 12:54
    
The second option (as I type this) does seem to be the most sensible refactoring but I don't think I'd find the flattened if/elseif type structure more readable than the original. If a refactor is needed I'd go for this over the do..while with breaks but I'd personally stick to the original since I think that lack of negations and explicit boolean logic make it easier to understand. –  Chris Jan 11 '12 at 12:57
1  
@Chris ergo the comment "although I don't know if this is more readable.". I agree, for this case I'd stick with what the op already has. For more conditions, I'd go with the latter ones. –  Luchian Grigore Jan 11 '12 at 13:00

NEW ANSWER AS QUESTION WAS EDITED

if ( condition1 && condition2 )
{
  //dosomething here 1 code 1
} 
else if ( condition1 && !condition2 )
{
  //dosomething here 2 code 2
} 
else if ( !condition1 && condition2 )
{
  //dosomething here 3 code 3
} 
else
{
  //dosomething here 4 code 4
}

FOLLOWING CODE IS NO LONGER VALID AS QUESTION HAS CHANGED!

I would do:

if(condition2)
{
   if(condition1)
   {
     //dosomething here
   }
   else
   {
     //dosomething here 2, 
     //which might be different than what we are doing above
   }
}

That's for your specific question, for more complex problems the solution might be different

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Chris I edited my answer according to the edited question. –  SERPRO Jan 11 '12 at 13:53

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