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I am trying to send email via System.Net.Mail. On clicking send I am getting the following exception

System.Net.Mail.SmtpFailedRecipientException: Mailbox name not allowed. The server response was: We do not relay non-local mail

        MailAddress toAddress = new MailAddress(toEmail);
        MailAddress fromAddress = new MailAddress(fromEmail);
        MailMessage mailMsg = new MailMessage(fromAddress, toAddress);

        mailMsg.Subject = EmailSubject;
        mailMsg.Body = MessageBody.ToString();
        mailMsg.IsBodyHtml = true;


        System.Net.Mail.SmtpClient smtp = new SmtpClient(EmailSettings.SmtpServer);
        smtp.Send(mailMsg);

That is all I am doing.

What workaround should I take for this to work

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1  
use a local smtp server (in your domain) or find one that does allow relaying with authentication. – Mitch Wheat Jan 11 '12 at 13:19
    
It'll help if you show some code, and anything related that you've defined in your web.config if applicable. – Brissles Jan 11 '12 at 13:21
    
both the to and from address are from the same server – Sandhurst Jan 11 '12 at 13:59
    
@Sandhurst: That might be not enough. Not only they have to be from the same server but also that server name should equal EmailSettings.SmtpServer value - including subdomains. – Sergey Kudriavtsev Jan 11 '12 at 14:09
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should authenticate your SMTP client using credentials AND sender mailbox belonging to SMTP server you're connecting to.

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Also (depending on your mail server) the fromAddress needs to be an actual account on the mail server.

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