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How should I call a Fortran function?

I am trying to call DLANSY but it erroneously returns 0. See the code and the program output below.

      SUBROUTINE COND(TYP,N,A,LDA,IPIV,WORK,LWORK,IWORK,INFO,RCOND)

      INTEGER TYP, N, LDA, IPIV(*), IWORK(*), INFO, LWORK
      DOUBLE PRECISION A(LDA,*), ANORM, RCOND, WORK(*)
      CHARACTER*1 UPLO
      EXTERNAL DLANSY, DSYTRF, DSYCON

      IF (TYP .EQ. 0) THEN 
        UPLO = 'L'
      ELSE
        UPLO = 'U'
      ENDIF

      DO I = 1, N
        DO J = 1,N 
          WRITE(*,*) I,J,A(I,J)
        END DO
      END DO

      WRITE(*,*) 'TYPE ',UPLO
      WRITE(*,*) 'N    ',N
      WRITE(*,*) 'LDA  ',LDA

      ANORM = DLANSY('1', UPLO, N, A, LDA, WORK)
C      ANORM = 10;

      WRITE(*,*) 'ANORM  ',ANORM

      END

And what it prints:

           1           1   1.0000000000000000     
           1           2   2.0000000000000000     
           1           3   3.0000000000000000     
           1           4   4.0000000000000000     
           2           1   1.0000000000000000     
           2           2   2.0000000000000000     
           2           3   3.0000000000000000     
           2           4   4.0000000000000000     
           3           1   1.0000000000000000     
           3           2   2.0000000000000000     
           3           3   3.0000000000000000     
           3           4   4.0000000000000000     
           4           1   1.0000000000000000     
           4           2   2.0000000000000000     
           4           3   3.0000000000000000     
           4           4   4.0000000000000000     
 TYPE L
 N               4
 LDA             4
 ANORM     0.0000000000000000   

In the input arrays are of proper size.

What is going on?

share|improve this question
    
Though this is irrelevant but, why exactly are you learning FORTRAN? Most universities have taken it out of their course , they don't even teach it as an educational language nowadays. –  ApprenticeHacker Jan 11 '12 at 13:56
    
@IntermediateHacker I have to call LAPACK from a C++ code. I cannot use CLAPACK. I do not want to use Fortran but I have no other opition. –  Ali Jan 11 '12 at 13:58
1  
@IntermediateHacker -- an awful lot of HPC and simulation codes - including new ones - are written in Fortran, which is actually designed for scientific computing. –  Jonathan Dursi Jan 11 '12 at 14:29
    
Found some examples on how to call it at nag.com/lapack-ex/examples/source/dsygv-ex.f and publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/clresctr/vxrx/… –  ja72 Jan 11 '12 at 15:06
    
Also it states that These subprograms compute the norm of matrix A, stored in upper or lower storage mode. So maybe the storage scheme for A is different from an A(n,n) 2D matrix. –  ja72 Jan 11 '12 at 15:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to tell the compiler that DLANSY returns a double precision value, rather than real, which is what you get currently via the implicit typing rules. E.g. with a line like

double precision, external :: dlansy

Or, if for some strange reason one is limited to some ancient compiler that does not support F90:

DOUBLE PRECISION DLANSY
EXTERNAL DLANSY
share|improve this answer
    
OK, I have to change the corresponding line to this: DOUBLE PRECISION A(LDA,*), ANORM, RCOND, WORK(*), DLANSY and drop the line with EXTERNAL ... –  Ali Jan 11 '12 at 14:14
    
Could you add this to your answer so that I can accept it? –  Ali Jan 11 '12 at 14:14
    
@Ali: Done. FWIW, there's nothing wrong with keeping the external; it tells the compiler than it's an external symbol, not a local variable. Better yet, use implicit none, and enable all the warning options your compiler has. –  janneb Jan 11 '12 at 14:45
    
Ah, -fimplicit-none, good! As for double precision, external :: dlansy could you add the F77 version instead? –  Ali Jan 11 '12 at 15:08
    
@Ali: Actually, I was thinking of putting a "implicit none" at the beginning of your procedure. As for F77, I try to avoid writing it myself, but as you wish... –  janneb Jan 11 '12 at 15:26

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