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Code I inherited has many transaction code methods of this form:

public void addCourseToCourses(String values)
{
    try
    {
        conn.setAutoCommit(false);
    }
    catch (SQLException e)
    {
        Logger.getLogger(connDb.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, e);
        return;
    }
    try
    {
        stmt.executeUpdate("insert into courses values " + values);
        conn.commit();
    }
    catch (SQLException e)
    {
        try
        {
            conn.rollback();
        }
        catch (SQLException ex)
        {
            Logger.getLogger(connDb.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE,null, ex);
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        try
        {
            conn.setAutoCommit(true);
        }
        catch (SQLException ex)
        {
            Logger.getLogger(connDb.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE,null, ex);
        }
    }
}

Where the variable part that differs between methods is

stmt.executeUpdate("insert into courses values " + values);

Some times it is several inserts, sometimes it is deletes. I Miss using Macros coming from C++, but I am sure there is a way not to repeat all this transaction code for each method.

help ?

(conn and stmt are class members of types java.sql.Connection and java.sql.Statement)

share|improve this question
    
Repeat? I didn't see any repeat. Every catch block does a unique work. where is the repetition? –  Adel Boutros Jan 11 '12 at 14:43
    
The repetition is that there are many methods like the one above each one having a different 'variable part' shown above –  thedrs Jan 11 '12 at 14:46
    
Apart from the problem of factoring out common tasks like logging and transaction handling, consider to use PreparedStatements instead of just Strings. –  Ingo Jan 11 '12 at 14:51
1  
I feel compelled to point out that you are open to SQL injection there. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 11 '12 at 14:52
    
@Tom: thanks, but all inputs are filtered for SQLi before passing to these functions –  thedrs Jan 11 '12 at 15:00
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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Create a method that takes an interface and wraps up the exception handling.

Each interface's anonymous (or not) implementation contains the SQL call, its parameters, etc.

For example (very roughly):

public void addCourseToCourses(final String values) {
    handleSql(new SqlCommand() {
        @Override public void run(Statement stmt) {
            stmt.executeUpdate("insert into courses values " + values);
        }
    });
}

The handleSql is a static import of something resembling:

public class SqlWrapper {
    public static void handleSql(SqlCommand cmd) {
        Connection conn = // get connection;
        try {
            conn.setAutoCommit(false);
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            LOG.log(Level.SEVERE, null, e);
            return;
        }

        try {
            cmd.run();
            conn.commit();
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            cleanRollback();
        } finally {
            cleanClose();
        }
    }
}

Various hooks can be added as seem reasonable. A generic version would allow various return types, which is likely more appropriate, just depends on what you actually need.

A comment mentions Runnable and Callable, IMO Runnable is specifically for threads (and the base interface isn't generic). Callable is a better choice, but I'd expect enough other hooks would be added to handle SQL-/JDBC-specific functionality that I'd use something app-specific. YMMV.

This pattern has been re-invented all over the place; it may make more sense to take something like Spring JDBC and just use that.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's been over 15 years since I last programmed in C++, but I'm pretty sure I remember that they included methods there too. –  Spencer Kormos Jan 11 '12 at 14:44
    
Damn, I thought it was C# and I was writing a suggestion with a delegate. Then I realized "duh, the question is about java." –  Mike Nakis Jan 11 '12 at 14:48
    
Yes, Callable<V> is better for it may turn out that one must repeat something. –  Ingo Jan 11 '12 at 15:43
    
Thanks I wasn't familiar with anonymous inner classes with overrides in Java. It was enlightening and constructive. Specenr Kormos's comment above was nonconstructive and of course is totally irrelevant because what I wanted to do could not be done with simple methods. –  thedrs Jan 18 '12 at 13:03
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Actually, you don't need a new interface. Existing ones like Runnable, or Callable will do just fine.

share|improve this answer
    
IMO it's unlikely that there would be only a single hook, rather there would be additional SQL-, JDBC-, or app-specific functionality. Maybe something extending Callable, but meh. Runnable implies a separate thread (at least to me) so I'd be wary of using it. –  Dave Newton Jan 11 '12 at 14:58
    
@Dave - Regarding Runnable, no, it doesn't. Look at it, it's just void run(); Just because one often uses Runnable to tell a thread what to do does not mean it's its only purpose. –  Ingo Jan 11 '12 at 15:24
    
I didn't say it was its only purpose, but the Javadocs explicitly state "[...] implemented by any class whose instances are intended to be executed by a thread." It is its canonical purpose. I specifically said "at least to me". Like it or not, Runnable communicates something that may not be intended. –  Dave Newton Jan 11 '12 at 15:33
    
Well then if you insist interface RunnableInSameThread extends Runnable {} Regarding the above cited sentence from the javadoc, it has the same logical status as "double will be used by any class that does numeric integration". That does not mean you cannot use double in classes that do something else. –  Ingo Jan 11 '12 at 15:39
    
Again: I never claimed otherwise. You'll have to continue this one on your own, arguing about something we agree on isn't enjoyable to me. –  Dave Newton Jan 11 '12 at 15:43
add comment

You use the "callback" pattern, which in java is accomplishing using anonymous classes, like this:

Create an interface to do the actual work:

interface Exec {
    exec(PreparedStatement stmt) throws SQLException;
}

Refactor your code to create method with the common code that accepts an Exec:

void perform(Exec exec) {
    try
    {
        conn.setAutoCommit(false);
    }
    catch (SQLException e)
    {
        Logger.getLogger(connDb.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, e);
        return;
    }
    try
    {
        exec.exec(stmt);
        conn.commit();
    }
    catch (SQLException e)
    {
        try
        {
            conn.rollback();
        }
        catch (SQLException ex)
        {
            Logger.getLogger(connDb.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE,null, ex);
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        try
        {
            conn.setAutoCommit(true);
        }
        catch (SQLException ex)
        {
            Logger.getLogger(connDb.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE,null, ex);
        }
    }
}

Refactor your methods like this:

public void addCourseToCourses(final String values)
{
    perform(new Exec() {
        exec(PreparedStatement stmt) throws SQLException {
            stmt.executeUpdate("insert into courses values " + values);
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
(Seems almost identical.) Is there a benefit to using a prepared statement when you're not preparing the statement? –  Dave Newton Jan 11 '12 at 16:48
    
@DaveNewton OP's question does't prepare it either (I noticed that too). I only refactored his code as-is, which answered his direct question. I didn't try to fix the code. –  Bohemian Jan 11 '12 at 23:33
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Why not then just do something like this:

public void addCourseToCourses(String values)
{
    callDB("insert into courses values " + values)
}

protected void callDB(String call)
{
    try
    {
        conn.setAutoCommit(false);
    }
    catch (SQLException e)
    {
        Logger.getLogger(connDb.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, e);
        return;
    }
    try
    {
        stmt.executeUpdate(call);
        conn.commit();
    }
    catch (SQLException e)
    {
        try
        {
            conn.rollback();
        }
        catch (SQLException ex)
        {
            Logger.getLogger(connDb.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE,null, ex);
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        try
        {
            conn.setAutoCommit(true);
        }
        catch (SQLException ex)
        {
            Logger.getLogger(connDb.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE,null, ex);
        }
    }
}

This way all your transaction-related code is in one place and each individual method is only responsible for formatting the corresponding statement.

share|improve this answer
1  
A quite bad idea. The door wide open to SQL exploits. No, use only PreparedStatements. –  Ingo Jan 11 '12 at 14:49
    
What if it's not an update? What if he needs stmt.executeQuery() or stmt.execute()? –  Bohemian Jan 11 '12 at 14:52
    
This method is not good because the variable part sometimes contains more than one sql action (3 inserts and 2 deletes for example) –  thedrs Jan 11 '12 at 14:56
    
@Ingo: I was literally translating the code in question. I wouldn't do it this way in my own code. –  Aleks G Jan 11 '12 at 14:58
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The more amateuristic approach would be to create a method like executeSQL that handle the common stuff and you simply pass the sql (String) to execute.

A better approach would be to have a look at Spring and let Spring handle transactions and excpetion handling for you.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Use a list of sql statements:

function void executeTransaction(List<String> sqlStatements) {
    // init transaction (as before)
    try
    {
        conn.setAutoCommit(false);
    }
    catch (SQLException e)
    {
        Logger.getLogger(connDb.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, e);
        return;
    }
    try
    {
        // execute all statements from transaction
        for(String statement: sqlStatements) {
           stmt.executeUpdate("insert into courses values " + values);
        }
        // Commit when all succeed
        conn.commit();
    }
    catch (SQLException e)
    {
        try
        {
            // rollback on failure (as before)
            conn.rollback();
        }
        catch (SQLException ex)
        {
            Logger.getLogger(connDb.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE,null, ex);
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        try
        {
            // cleanup (as before)
            conn.setAutoCommit(true);
        }
        catch (SQLException ex)
        {
            Logger.getLogger(connDb.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE,null, ex);
        }
    }
}
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