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I'd like to select the first two list items in an unordered list. I can select the first item thus:

ul li:nth-child(1) a {
    background: none repeat scroll 0 0 beige;
}

OR

ul li:first-child a {
    background: none repeat scroll 0 0 beige;
}

I'd like to select both the first and second line item - how do I do that?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Without the use of js or :nth-child (which I believe is not supported in IE)

ul li:first-child, ul li:first-child + li {
    list-style: none;
}

Here is a demo tested in IE7

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2  
+1 for :first-child and adjacent sibling selector, great for compatibility all the way down to IE7. –  BoltClock Jan 11 '12 at 15:09

For selecting the first and second children, you can use a single :nth-child() pseudo-class like so:

ul li:nth-child(-n+2) a {
    background: none repeat scroll 0 0 beige;
}
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1  
Nice. I didn't know about using a=-1. –  tvanfosson Jan 11 '12 at 15:03

This works in IE9+ but it's not the shortest. @BoltClock's selector is the shortest solution for IE9+. I think this one is marginally easier to understand so I'll leave it as an alternative.

ul li:first-child a, ul li:nth-child(2) a
{
   background: none repeat scroll 0 0 biege;
}
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thanks. so I must separate by comma each selector - there is no way to select both in the same selector? I was thinking something along the lines of ul li:nth-child(1,2) a - of course that does not work but I was thinking there may be something similar that does? –  Doug Firr Jan 11 '12 at 14:53
    
@tvanfosson: With an + b, you can simply pass a negative a and it'll pick up the first b children only. See my answer. –  BoltClock Jan 11 '12 at 15:00
    
@BoltClock - I learn something new every day. +1 to you, but I'll leave mine here (after some consideration) as I think it's marginally easier to understand what's happening. –  tvanfosson Jan 11 '12 at 15:37
    
Indeed, I was this close to clicking undelete on your answer :) –  BoltClock Jan 11 '12 at 16:27

Your best bet for cross-browser compatibility would be to use jQuery and assign a class to the list item.

Something like...

$( function() {

 $('li').each( function() {
   if( $(this).index() == 1 || $(this).index() == 2 ) {
     $(this).addClass('first_or_second');
   }
 });

});
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browsers without javascript? –  Abe Petrillo Jan 11 '12 at 14:53

This will do:

ul li:nth-child(1) a, ul li:first-child a {
    background: none repeat scroll 0 0 beige; 
}
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2  
What's the difference between :nth-child(1) and :first-child? Even if you were including the latter for IE7 and IE8 support, combining it with the former in the same rule will just cause them to ignore it. –  BoltClock Jan 11 '12 at 14:55
    
Just answered the question which was how to select these both at once. I did not think much about compatibility with browsers I never use or santify his examples. - I did just show him how to select these both. –  Hikaru-Shindo Jan 11 '12 at 15:27
    
They both select the same thing - only the first child. It doesn't select the second. –  BoltClock Jan 11 '12 at 15:29
    
This doesn't answer the question it only combines his two examples of selecting the first child and entirely leaves out the second child. Either the OP's question is wrong or this answer was wrongly accepted. –  tvanfosson Jan 11 '12 at 15:30
    
As said - I did not santify his examples for selection. –  Hikaru-Shindo Jan 11 '12 at 15:31

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