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Here is my code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>


int main() {

 char f[] = "First";
 char s[] = "Second";
 char *tmp = malloc(strlen(f) + strlen(s) + 2);
 strcpy(tmp, f);
 strcpy(tmp, s);
 printf("%s", tmp);
 free(tmp);
 return 0;
}

I'm trying to concatenate f and s. The problem is that tmp contains only "Second" as a array. What I miss here

share|improve this question
    
swap the two strcpy lines around, you'll see it just says "first" it could also say "firstd" –  Joseph Le Brech Jan 11 '12 at 14:58
    
@Joseph Le Brech: I'm really interested in how that would happen? –  sharptooth Jan 11 '12 at 16:35
    
isn't strcpy, copying to the beginning of the string and not appending. wouldn't you have to strcpy to &(*tmp+sizeOf(tmp). or what @dasblinkenlight wrote. –  Joseph Le Brech Jan 11 '12 at 17:03

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you insist on using strcpy, your code should be slightly modified:

int main() {
    const char *f = "First";
    const char *s = "Second";
    char *tmp = malloc(strlen(f) + strlen(s) + 1);
    strcpy(tmp, f);
    strcpy(tmp+strlen(f), s);
    printf("%s", tmp);
    free(tmp);
    return 0;
}

You should consider using strncpy instead of strcpy for safety reasons. Also, strcat is a more conventional function for concatenating C string.

EDIT Here is an example of using strncpy instead of strcpy

#define MAX 1024

int main() {
    const char *f = "First";
    const char *s = "Second";
    size_t len_f = min(strlen(f), MAX);
    size_t len_s = min(strlen(s), MAX);
    size_t len_total = len_f + len_s;
    char *tmp = malloc(len_total + 1);
    strncpy(tmp, f, len_f);
    strncpy(tmp+len_f, s, len_s);
    tmp[len_total] = '\0';
    printf("%s", tmp);
    free(tmp);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I looking for ! Thanks ! –  pr1m3x Jan 11 '12 at 14:58
1  
There's absolutely no benefits from using strncpy() instead of strcpy() in this very case. That's like Microsoft forcing functions with _s suffix everywhere. –  sharptooth Jan 11 '12 at 16:04
1  
strncpy should never be used unless you're working with fixed-width, not-necessarily-terminated string fields in structures/binary files. –  R.. Jan 11 '12 at 16:22
    
@sharptooth There is indeed no reason to use strncpy in toy cases, such as this one. However, it is very important to get into a habit of using strncpy without thinking twice, to avoid using strcpy when it may really matter. For example, if you change this very program to take f and s as parameters, switching to strncpy becomes imperative in multithreaded environments. Otherwise, malicious code could move the terminating zero in one of the strings between you calling malloc(strlen(f) + strlen(s) + 1) and the calls to strcpy. You'd need to limit strlen(f) + strlen(s) too. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 11 '12 at 16:24
1  
Well you're wrong. strncpy is not for bounded copying. You're confusing it with the BSD function strlcpy. The only easy-to-use, safe, general-purpose string assembly function in C is snprintf and unless you really know what you're doing and have a good reason not to, you should always just use snprintf. –  R.. Jan 11 '12 at 16:29

using strcat() instead, which means append a string accroding to the MSDN doc.strcpy() just means copy a string. If you don't want to use strcat(), you should point out the position by using strncpy() or strcpy_s(). Please refer to the document.

share|improve this answer

Here is the correct idiomatic safe way to do what you want:

size_t l = strlen(f);
char *tmp = malloc(l + strlen(s) + 1);
strcpy(tmp, f);
strcpy(tmp+l, s);

or:

size_t l = strlen(f) + strlen(s) + 1;
char *tmp = malloc(l);
snprintf(tmp, l, "%s%s", f, s);

I tend to prefer the latter unless you're writing embedded systems code where you want to avoid pulling in printf dependency.

Finally, note that you should be testing malloc for failure, and that it's useless and harmful to allocate memory and copy the strings if all you want to do is print them - you could just do the following:

printf("%s%s", f, s);
share|improve this answer
    
Ugh! If you must use single-letter identifiers, at least do not use lowercase L (or uppercase i). –  pmg Jan 11 '12 at 16:35
    
@pmg that's also the first thing that struck me ;) –  ouah Jan 11 '12 at 17:05

The problem is that you copy the second string in place of the first one (the first parameter of strcpy() is where to copy the string) and this effectively overwrites the first string. Here's an idea of what you need:

size_t firstLen = strlen( f );
size_t secondLen = strlen( s );    
char *tmp = malloc(firstLen + secondLen + 1);
strcpy(tmp, f);
strcpy(tmp + firstLen, s);

This can be achieved by using strcat(), although that would lead to an extra scan along the copied string.

share|improve this answer

The second strcpy overwrites the previous one. Both copy its content to the tmp pointer (at the start of it). You should use tmp+strlen(f).

Or even better use strcat.

And even better use more secure methods like: strncpy, strncat, etc..

share|improve this answer
3  
Neither strncpy() nor strncat() provide any additional safety in this case. –  sharptooth Jan 11 '12 at 15:00
    
+1 for recommended the "n" (bounded) versions... –  Throwback1986 Jan 11 '12 at 15:00
    
@Throwback1986: The n-versions add no (exactly zero) benefits here. –  sharptooth Jan 11 '12 at 15:03
    
@sharptooth: Yes, I hope he didn't paste his whole code here, where it probably would make sense to use n-versions. –  duedl0r Jan 11 '12 at 15:49
1  
-1 for recommending "n" versions. They do not do what you think. –  R.. Jan 11 '12 at 16:28

You may want to use strcat instead of your second strcpy call, like this:

strcpy(tmp, f);
strcat(tmp, s);

Note also that allocating strlen(f) + strlen(s) + 1 bytes for tmp is sufficient no need to allocate strlen(f) + strlen(s) + 2 bytes. After concatenation, you'll get only one string, so only one null character is required.

share|improve this answer

strcpy copies the string to the beginning of the destination, you want strcat instead.

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