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I have table of user actions, each having a user associated, a type, and a timestamp. Here's a simplified example:

TABLE USER_ACTIONS
------------------------
USER | TYPE  | TIMESTAMP
------------------------
a    | OPEN  | 0
b    | OPEN  | 1
a    | CLOSE | 2
a    | OPEN  | 3
b    | CLOSE | 4
a    | CLOSE | 4
a    | OPEN  | 5  <-- "orphaned" OPEN, with no corresponding CLOSE. Should be ignored.
c    | OPEN  | 3
c    | CLOSE | 5
a    | OPEN  | 6
a    | CLOSE | 8

I'd like to get a list of transaction times out of this. Each CLOSE should match the previous OPEN, for a particular user.

The results I'd like will look something like this:

USER | TRANSACTION_TIME
-----------------------
a    | 2
b    | 3
a    | 1
c    | 2
a    | 2

I don't care about the ordering.

I know that this is possible to do programmatically, but is it possible to do with some clever SQL?

UPDATE:

To do this programmatically, the general idea would be to...

  1. Select all of the "CLOSE" actions, ordering by TIMESTAMP descending.
  2. For each of those in that list, try to find a previous "OPEN" action made by the same user. Limit the TIMESTAMP to be before the "CLOSE" action TIMESTAMP, sort the results by TIMESTAMP DESC, and limit them to 1.
  3. For that pair, calculate the time difference, and ouput the result.

Here's some pseudocode, but really I'd like SQL that does this cleverly:

for each CLOSE_ACTION IN ("SELECT USER, TYPE, TIMESTAMP FROM USER_ACTIONS WHERE TYPE='CLOSE' ORDER BY TIMESTAMP DESC;") {
    OPEN_ACTION = "SELECT USER, TYPE, TIMESTAMP FROM USER_ACTIONS
                   WHERE TYPE='OPEN'
                   AND USER='<CLOSE_ACTION.USER>'
                   AND TIMESTAMP='<CLOSE_ACTION.TIMESTAMP>'
                   ORDER BY TIMESTAMP DESC
                   LIMIT 1";
    if OPEN_ACTION != empty/null then {
        print CLOSE_ACTION.USER, CLOSE_ACTION.TIMESTAMP - OPEN_ACTION.TIMESTAMP;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Do you know that you always have the CLOSE associated to an OPEN? Or could the seqeunce for a user be OPEN, OPEN, CLOSE, OPEN, OPEN, CLOSE, CLOSE, etc? If the data isn't completely clean, do you know how you want to handle such scenarios? (Ignore repeated opens, but treat CLOSE, CLOSE as if it were really CLOSE, OPEN, CLOSE, for example?) –  MatBailie Jan 11 '12 at 16:24
    
Good question: unfortunately there is NOT a CLOSE for every OPEN. I'll update my table to reflect that. For those cases, I'd just like the orphaned OPEN to be ignored, and not counted. –  Mike Cialowicz Jan 11 '12 at 16:31
    
From your example, if the pattern is OPEN, CLOSE, CLOSE, which close should be ignored? My answer presently ignored the 2nd CLOSE, and meets the rest of your description. –  MatBailie Jan 11 '12 at 16:49
    
With OPEN, CLOSE, CLOSE (for the same user), ignoring the latter CLOSE is correct. It's OPEN, OPEN, CLOSE that's more complicated. The second OPEN should be matched to the CLOSE (and the first one ignored)... so I think that works correctly as well. –  Mike Cialowicz Jan 11 '12 at 17:20
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This takes each CLOSE event and matches it to the preceding event, if and only if the preceding event is an OPEN.

SELECT
  OPEN.user,
  OPEN.transaction_time
  CLOSE.transaction_time
FROM
  user_actions as CLOSE
INNER JOIN
  user_actions as OPEN
    ON  OPEN.user = CLOSE.user
    AND OPEN.transaction_time = (SELECT MAX(transaction_time) FROM user_action
                                 WHERE user = CLOSE.user
                                 AND transaction_time < CLOSE.transaction_time
                                 AND type='OPEN')
WHERE
    CLOSE.type = 'CLOSE'
share|improve this answer
    
This seems very, very close but I can't quite get it to work. I'm going to keep fiddling with it. I may edit your answer once I get it working. –  Mike Cialowicz Jan 11 '12 at 16:58
    
Boom. Works! Thank you! –  Mike Cialowicz Jan 11 '12 at 17:02
    
Note, after your edit, this changes the behavior in the case of OPEN, CLOSE, CLOSE, now BOTH closes reference are used and BOTH look back to the same OPEN. –  MatBailie Jan 11 '12 at 18:00
    
That's OK. In this dataset we never have two closes for an open. Only multiple opens for a close. –  Mike Cialowicz Jan 11 '12 at 18:04
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Try:

select user,
       timestamp,
       (select min(timestamp) 
        from user_actions u 
        where a.user = u.user and 
              u.type = 'CLOSE' and 
              u.timestamp > a.timestamp) - timestamp
from user_actions a
where type = 'OPEN'

(Assumes there will always be a matching close for each open.)

share|improve this answer
    
and u.timestamp > a.timestamp? –  MatBailie Jan 11 '12 at 16:46
    
@Dems: d'oh! Thank you! –  Mark Bannister Jan 11 '12 at 17:07
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The below query works fine for the question posed. I have executed it on my local machine and it seems to work fine.

select u1.user_name ,u2.timestamp- max(u1.timestamp) difference
from user_actions u1,user_actions u2 
where u1.type = 'OPEN' and 
u2.type = 'CLOSE' and
u1.timestamp <u2.timestamp and u1.user_name = u2.user_name
group by (u1.user_name , u2.timestamp);
share|improve this answer
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