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Given the plain text file with lines

bli foo bla
 abc
 dfg
bli foo bla
 hik
 lmn

what sed or awk magic transforms it to

bli foo_01 bla
 abc
 dfg
bli foo_02 bla
 hik
 lmn

so that every occurence of 'foo' is replaced by 'foo_[occurence number]'.

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Michael, More explanation of the requirements, and especially the input format is required for anyone to attempt to answer this question meaninfully... I presume you've dummied up what is intended to be a simplified but representative sample of a real-world file... What is that file? a log file? a mysql log file? Just a guess. Cheers. Keith. –  corlettk May 19 '09 at 12:09
    
actually it's a java source file and the transformation is used to make the method names unique –  Michael Locher May 19 '09 at 12:16
    
hi guys, thanks for the solutions, I modified the question a bit, adding some noise around the foo –  Michael Locher May 19 '09 at 12:22
    
Yeah, ain't it funny how programmers resort to perl, awk, nawk, ed, sed, and/or tr when they just want to get something done ;-) –  corlettk May 19 '09 at 12:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is another way to express radoulov's answer

awk '/foo/ {sub(/foo/, "&_" sprintf("%02d",++c))} 1' infile

You should take care that you don't match "foobar" while looking for "foo":

gawk '/\<foo\>/ {sub(/\<foo\>/, "&_" sprintf("%02d",++c))} 1'
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awk '!/foo/||sub(/foo/,"&_"++_)' infile

Use gawk, nawk or /usr/xpg4/bin/awk on Solaris.

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This probably isn't what you require, but it might give some ideas in the right direction.

Administrator@snadbox3 ~
$ cd c:/tmp

Administrator@snadbox3 /cygdrive/c/tmp
$ cat <<-eof >foo.txt
> foo
>  abc
>  dfg
> foo
>  hik
>  lmn
> eof

Administrator@snadbox3 /cygdrive/c/tmp
$ awk '/^foo$/{++fooCount; print($0 "_" fooCount);} /^ /{print}' foo.txt
foo_1
 abc
 dfg
foo_2
 hik
 lmn


EDIT:

I'm a day late and a penny short, again ;-(


EDIT2:

Character encodings is another thing to lookout for... Java source code isn't necessarily in the systems default encoding... it's quit UTF-8 encoded, to allow for any embedded "higher order entities" ;-) Many *nix utilities still aren't charset-aware.

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