Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Looking through the Django docs and trying to figure out the use of the "through" argument. Here is a link to the doc.

The example:

class Person(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=128)

    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.name

class Group(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=128)
    members = models.ManyToManyField(Person, through='Membership')

    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.name

class Membership(models.Model):
    person = models.ForeignKey(Person)
    group = models.ForeignKey(Group)
    date_joined = models.DateField()
    invite_reason = models.CharField(max_length=64)

Why is the "members" attribute of Group even needed? Isn't the 'group' ForeignKey of Membership enough to follow the relation and access that information?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you're thinking a little too literally about this. Let's say you didn't use through:

class Person(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=128)

    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.name

class Group(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=128)
    members = models.ManyToManyField(Person)

    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.name

Django, behind the scenes, essentially creates the following model for you:

class GroupPerson(models.Model)
    group = models.ForeignKey(Group)
    person = models.ForeignKey(Person)

The reason for creating a Membership model is to add extra data that the default model Django automatically creates wouldn't have by default, but since you're no longer using the default, you have to tell Django that, using through. Basically, you're preserving the API Django provides for ManyToManyFields.

share|improve this answer

The reason why one would do this is so that Group has a field for this relationship, rather than having to follow the relationship back through its membership_set.

If nothing else, this can make writing queries simpler. At the very least, this can make a programmer's life easier, and code easier to read. A sufficiently optimising ORM would be able to generate appropriate indices to speed up such access (and unless I'm very much mistaken, django does indeed do that; or at least South does).

share|improve this answer
    
Does that make it more efficient? Or is it just a matter of convenience? –  Matt Parrilla Jan 11 '12 at 17:18
    
@Matt See update. –  Marcin Jan 11 '12 at 17:26

It's so that, from Group, you can directly access the members. You don't necessarily want to deal with Membership objects directly (the user my never even see them). You just want groups with some extra information stored. Think of Membership as meta-data on the association between Person and Group.

share|improve this answer
    
But what would the difference be between having members stored as a ManyToMany in Groups rather than needing to follow a backwards relation to Membership? –  Matt Parrilla Jan 11 '12 at 17:20
    
I guess my real question is, why don't I want to deal with Membership objects directly? –  Matt Parrilla Jan 11 '12 at 17:22
1  
Because you would typically be dealing with a Person object or a Group object as the result of some action by the user. A Membership object is most likely just some data that you would occasionally display, but would not be something you would be passing around between the view/template. –  jknupp Jan 11 '12 at 17:33

through tables are used to store properties of the relation, in this case, e.g. the date a Person joined a particular Group

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.