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I'm trying to write a function which re-uses the implicit conversions which I have for Object A -> Object B when they are wrapped in an Option in a generic way so that Option[A] -> Option[B] conversions also work.

What I've come up with is:

implicit def fromOptionToOption[A, B](from: Option[A])(implicit conversion: (A) => B): Option[B] = from.map(conversion(_))

This works when I assign a Some(..) to a value but not when I assign an Option val; see the following console output:

scala> trait T
defined trait T

scala> case class Foo(i: Int) extends T
defined class Foo

scala> case class Bar(i: Int) extends T
defined class Bar

scala> implicit def fromFooToBar(f: Foo):Bar = Bar(f.i)
fromFooToBar: (f: Foo)Bar

scala> implicit def fromBarToFoo(b: Bar):Foo = Foo(b.i)
fromBarToFoo: (b: Bar)Foo

scala> implicit def fromOptionToOption[A, B](from: Option[A])(implicit conversion: (A) => B): Option[B] = from.map(conversion(_))
fromOptionToOption: [A, B](from: Option[A])(implicit conversion: (A) => B)Option[B]

scala> val foo: Option[Foo] = Some(Bar(1))
foo: Option[Foo] = Some(Foo(1))
// THIS WORKS as expected

scala> val fooOpt = Some(Foo(4))
fooOpt: Some[Foo] = Some(Foo(4))

scala> val barOpt2: Option[Bar] = fooOpt
<console>:16: error: type mismatch;
 found   : Some[Foo]
 required: Option[Bar]
       val barOpt2: Option[Bar] = fooOpt
                                  ^
//THIS FAILS.

I don't really see the difference between the first and second conversion. Somehow it doesn't invoke the implicit conversion in the latter. I guess it has something to do with the type system, but I can't see how just yet. Any ideas? -Albert (I'm on scala 2.9.1)

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2  
In the first case, it's invoking fromFooToBar alone (it decides that since it needs an Option[Bar], it should really call Some(x: Bar), and does the conversion to get there); in the second it has to invoke fromOptionToOption and doesn't. This explains the difference, but I am not sure how to solve the problem. –  Rex Kerr Jan 11 '12 at 17:47
    
Note: val barOpt: Option[Bar] = Some(Foo(4)) works as expected. –  Dan Burton Jan 11 '12 at 18:13
1  
@Dan Burton - Exactly; this is because it is turned into Some(fromBarToFoo(Foo(4))). –  Rex Kerr Jan 11 '12 at 18:27
    
I've wrapped up a solution using Scalaz's functors, see threedimensionsblog.blogspot.de/2013/11/… –  longliveenduro Nov 14 '13 at 10:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Here's clue:

scala> val fooOpt: Option[Bar] = Option(Foo(1))
fooOpt: Option[Bar] = Some(Bar(1))

And another:

scala> implicit def foobar(x: String): Int = augmentString(x).toInt
foobar: (x: String)Int

scala> val y: Option[String] = Option(1)
y: Option[String] = Some(1)

scala> val y: Option[Int] = Option("1")
y: Option[Int] = Some(1)

Looks like a legitimately odd bug. I'd pop open a smaller test case and open an issue (or search for one in JIRA).

As an aside:

You could use some category theory to handle lots of different types of "Option-ish" things.

package object fun {
  trait Functor[Container[_]] {
    def fmap[A,B](x: Container[A], f: A => B): Container[B]
  }
  object Functor {
     implicit object optionFunctor extends Functor[Option] {
       override def fmap[A,B](x: Option[A], f: A => B): Option[B] = x map f
     }
     // Note: With some CanBuildFrom magic, we can support Traversables here.
  }
  implicit def liftConversion[F[_], A, B](x: F[A])(implicit f: A => B, functor: Functor[F]): F[B] = 
    functor.fmap(x,f)

}

That's a bit more advanced, as you're mapping some category theory FP onto the problem, but it's a more general solution to lift implicit conversations into containers as needed. Notice how they chain by using one implicit conversation method that takes a more limited implicit argument.

ALSO, this should make the examples work:

scala> val tmp = Option(Foo(1))
tmp: Option[Foo] = Some(Foo(1))

scala> val y: Option[Bar] = tmp
y: Option[Bar] = Some(Bar(1))

And make your usage of Some more dangerous:

scala> val tmp = Some(Foo(1))
tmp: Some[Foo] = Some(Foo(1))

scala> val y: Option[Bar] = tmp
<console>:25: error: could not find implicit value for parameter functor: fun.Functor[Some]
       val y: Option[Bar] = tmp
                            ^

That's telling you that variance is critical, and interacts with implicits. My guess is you ran into a very rare, probably hard to fix bug that can be avoided using other techniques.

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Thanks! So your saying that my solution should work? Could you also point me to some explanation of category theory (I'm not that great at FP) –  Albert Jan 11 '12 at 20:35
    
Tsk, tsk, tsk... you should do a better job at debugging the issue! :-) –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 11 '12 at 21:01
    
I've tried the category theory solution and that solves it. Still not sure how it works though.. Thanks again –  Albert Jan 11 '12 at 21:41
    
I believe it solves it by moving polymorphic bits to a different lookup location. As for the issue itself, I think Martin or Adriaan might be able to help, but not me. As for category theory, I outline the basics as best I can here: manning.com/suereth –  jsuereth Jan 11 '12 at 22:49
    
The first example after the ALSO is not working, at least not at 2.9.1. @jsuereth did you meant that this is the bug? –  pedrofurla Jan 11 '12 at 22:53

You might not be aware of it, but there's a flag for that: -Xlog-implicits. And this is what it says:

scala> val barOpt2: Option[Bar] = fooOpt
fromOptionToOption is not a valid implicit value for Some[Foo] => Option[Bar] because:
incompatible: (from: Option[Foo])(implicit conversion: Foo => B)Option[B] does not match expected type Some[Foo] => Option[Bar]
<console>:16: error: type mismatch;
 found   : Some[Foo]
 required: Option[Bar]
       val barOpt2: Option[Bar] = fooOpt
                                  ^

And there you go -- it doesn't know what type B must be. 0__ mentioned that this problem doesn't happen with invariant collections, and that makes some sense. In invariant collections, B must be exactly Bar, while for covariant collections it could be any subtype of Bar.

So, why does val foo: Option[Foo] = Some(Bar(1)) work? Well, there's a flag for that too... -Ytyper-debug. Not for the weak, however, given the extreme verbosity.

I waddled through anyway, comparing what happens in both cases, and the answer is rather simple... it's not the Option that is being converted in that case, but Bar! Remember, you declared an implicit conversion from Bar => Foo, so it is applying that conversion before passing the result to Some!

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Thanks! Didn't know about those flags, certainly helps. I'm starting to 'get' it. Is there a way to make the conversion work with covariant types? (I wouldn't know how to) –  Albert Jan 11 '12 at 21:31
    
This is correct, but it's just more explanation of the way in which scalac is failing to fill in the types in the only possibly sensible way, given fully adequate information. It can, after all, pick B such that it works, and it knows exactly what it needs in order for it to work. It just reports it to you instead of doing it itself. –  Rex Kerr Jan 11 '12 at 22:05
    
the option is -Xlog-implicits final s –  pedrofurla Jan 11 '12 at 22:57
    
@pedrofurla I could swear I copy&pasted that option. Weird. Fixed. I hope you are telling me the truth... :-) –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 11 '12 at 23:55
    
That should be the tagline for Scala: "there's a flag for that" =) –  Dan Burton Jan 12 '12 at 1:36

It doesn't work because the Scala Language Specification defines view as follows:

Implicit parameters and methods can also define implicit conversions called views. A view from type S to type T is defined by an implicit value which has function type S=>T or (=>S)=>T or by a method convertible to a value of that type.

fromOptionToOption doesn't conform to the three categories since it takes an implicit parameter. Compiler doesn't seem to find converter with both destination and source having generic type.

Defining a view from Option[Foo] to Option[Bar] works as expected.

trait T
case class Foo(i: Int) extends T
case class Bar(i: Int) extends T

object Main {
  implicit def fromFooToBar(f: Foo):Bar = Bar(f.i)
  implicit def fromBarToFoo(b: Bar):Foo = Foo(b.i)
  // implicit def fromOptionToOption[A, B](from: Option[A])(implicit conversion: (A) => B): Option[B] =
  //  from.map(conversion(_))
  implicit def fromOptionFooToOptionBar(o: Option[Foo]): Option[Bar] = o map { foo => foo } 

  def test(): Option[Bar] = {
    val fooOpt = Some(Foo(4))
    val barOpt2: Option[Bar] = fooOpt

    barOpt2
  }
}

println(Main.test)

Running this prints out:

$ scala so.scala
Some(Bar(4))

However, all is not lost. It's not as nice as general Option to Option, but we can do something like anything that can turn into Bar to Option[Bar] by view bound.

trait T
case class Foo(i: Int) extends T
case class Bar(i: Int) extends T

object Main {
  implicit def fromFooToBar(f: Foo):Bar = Bar(f.i)
  implicit def fromBarToFoo(b: Bar):Foo = Foo(b.i)
  implicit def fromOptionToOptionBar[A <% Bar](from: Option[A]): Option[Bar] =
    from map { foo => foo }

  def test(): Option[Bar] = {
    val fooOpt = Some(Foo(4))
    val barOpt2: Option[Bar] = fooOpt

    barOpt2
  }
}

println(Main.test)

Here's another workaround that can be used for general Option to Option but requires extra .convert call:

trait T
case class Foo(i: Int) extends T
case class Bar(i: Int) extends T

case class Converter[A](x: Option[A]) {
  def convert[B](implicit ev: Function1[A, B]): Option[B] = x map { a: A => ev(a) }
}

object Main {
  implicit def optionToConverter[A](x: Option[A]) = Converter(x)
  implicit def fooToBar(x: Foo) = Bar(x.i)

  def test(): Option[Bar] = {
    val fooOpt = Some(Foo(4))
    val barOpt: Option[Bar] = fooOpt.convert
    barOpt
  }
}

println(Main.test)
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1  
Hm, AFAIK views are not restricted to having no implicit parameters themselves. The best proof at this point might be the view bound that you're using in fromOptionToOptionBar[A <% Bar] which itself is nothing but an implicit parameter (or more precisely, another implicit conversion), only with syntactic sugar. –  fotNelton Jan 11 '12 at 22:03
    
@fotNelton you're right. I am guessing the problem is actually because both source and destination has generic type. –  Eugene Yokota Jan 11 '12 at 22:13
    
In spite of having read almost all of the answers and comments I haven't grasped the real reason so far. But time will come, I hope :) –  fotNelton Jan 11 '12 at 22:19

Indeed it's a very strange problem. I tried to use another type than Option, and it turns out that the problem is that Option is covariant in its type parameter. This works all:

case class A[B](value: B)  // invariant in B

case class X()
case class Y()

implicit def xtoy(x: X): Y = Y()
implicit def ytox(x: Y): X = X()
implicit def movea[U, V](from: A[U])(implicit view: U => V): A[V] =  A[V](from.value)

def test(a: A[Y]) = "ok"
test(A(X()))   // (1)
val f = A(X())
test(f)        // (2)

But if instead I define A as

case class A[+B](value: B)  // covariant in B

The case (2) fails. Case (1) always succeeds, because Scala already converts X to Y before wrapping it in an A.

Now that we know the problem source, you need to wait for a type guru to explain why this is actually a problem... The conversion is still valid, you see:

askForY(movea(f))  // succeeds, even with A[+B]
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Wonder if this is the same problem as in this seemingly unanswered question: stackoverflow.com/questions/8472134/… –  0__ Jan 11 '12 at 18:16

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