Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to convert String to Date in different formats.

For example,

I am getting from user,

String fromDate = "19/05/2009"; // i.e. (dd/MM/yyyy) format

I want to convert this fromDate as a Date object of "yyyy-MM-dd" format

How can I do this?

share|improve this question
    
A Date object has no format, it is just a number representing the date. The date can be represented by a String with the format of "yyyy-MM-dd". –  Carlos Heuberger May 19 '09 at 13:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 82 down vote accepted

Take a look at SimpleDateFormat. The code goes something like this:

SimpleDateFormat fromUser = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy");
SimpleDateFormat myFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");

try {

    String reformattedStr = myFormat.format(fromUser.parse(inputString));
} catch (ParseException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
share|improve this answer
    
instead of getting string format, can i get output in Date format? –  Rachel Apr 20 '12 at 14:01
2  
@Rachel: Sure, just use parse and don't go on to format. parse parses a String to a Date. –  Michael Myers Apr 20 '12 at 14:19
1  
But parse gives me in date format as Fri Jan 06 00:01:00 EST 2012 but it need in 2012-01-06 date format –  Rachel Apr 20 '12 at 14:23
    
@Rachel it is because when you call System.out.println(anyDateObject) the default toString() method is called which has been said to print in that format e.g. Fri Jan 06 00:01:00 EST 2012. You need to override it to suit your needs. –  KNU Feb 28 at 7:07
    
@Rachel you must see toString() for Date Class to understanding why it works that way. –  KNU Feb 28 at 7:16

Check the javadocs for java.text.SimpleDateFormat It describes everything you need.

share|improve this answer

Use the SimpleDateFormat class:

private Date parseDate(String date, String format) throws ParseException
{
    SimpleDateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat(format);
    return formatter.parse(date);
}

Usage:

Date date = parseDate("19/05/2009", "dd/MM/yyyy");

For efficiency, you would want to store your formatters in a hashmap. The hashmap is a static member of your util class.

private static Map<String, SimpleDateFormat> hashFormatters = new HashMap<String, SimpleDateFormat>();

public static Date parseDate(String date, String format) throws ParseException
{
    SimpleDateFormat formatter = hashFormatters.get(format);

    if (formatter == null)
    {
        formatter = new SimpleDateFormat(format);
        hashFormatters.put(format, formatter);
    }

    return formatter.parse(date);
}
share|improve this answer
7  
CAVEAT!! The idea is good, but the implementation is not. DateFormats must not be stored statically, because they are not thread-safe! If they are used from more than one thread (and this is always risky with statics). FindBugs contains a detector for this (which I happened to contribute initially, after I got bitten. See dschneller.blogspot.com/2007/04/… :-)) –  Daniel Schneller May 19 '09 at 12:54
    
Your blog entry is an interesting read :-) What if the parseDate-method itself i synchronized? The problem though is that it would probably slow the code down... –  Agora May 19 '09 at 13:05
1  
As long as the parseDate method was the only method accessing the map, synchronizing it would work. However this would - as you say - introduce a bottleneck. –  Daniel Schneller May 19 '09 at 13:24

While SimpleDateFormat will indeed work for your needs, additionally you might want to check out Joda Time, which is apparently the basis for the redone Date library in Java 7. While I haven't used it a lot, I've heard nothing but good things about it and if your manipulating dates extensively in your projects it would probably be worth looking into.

share|improve this answer
    
Joda is good! Yay! –  Steve McLeod May 19 '09 at 12:50

Convert a string date to java.sql.Date

String fromDate = "19/05/2009";
DateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy");
java.util.Date dtt = df.parse(fromDate);
java.sql.Date ds = new java.sql.Date(dtt.getTime());
System.out.println(ds);//Mon Jul 05 00:00:00 IST 2010
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.