Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was given a SQL query, saying that I have to optimize this query.

I came accross explain plan. So, in SQL developer, I ran explain plan for ,

It divided the query into different parts and showed the cost for each of them.

How do I go about optimizing the query? What do I look for? Elements with high costs?

I am a bit new to DB, so if you need more information, please ask me, and I will try to get it.

I am trying to understand the process rather than just posting the query itself and getting the answer.

The query in question:

SELECT cr.client_app_id,
  cr.personal_flg,
  r.requestor_type_id 
FROM credit_request cr,
  requestor r,
  evaluator e 
WHERE cr.evaluator_id = 96 AND
  cr.request_id = r.request_id AND
  cr.evaluator_id = e.evaluator_id AND
  cr.request_id != 143462 AND
  ((r.soc_sec_num_txt = 'xxxxxxxxx' AND         
  r.soc_sec_num_txt IS NOT NULL) OR
  (lower(r.first_name_txt) = 'test' AND
  lower(r.last_name_txt) = 'newprogram' AND
  to_char(r.birth_dt, 'MM/DD/YYYY') = '01/02/1960' AND
  r.last_name_txt IS NOT NULL AND
  r.first_name_txt IS NOT NULL AND
  r.birth_dt IS NOT NULL))

On running explain plan, I am trying to upload the screenshot.

OPERATION    OBJECT_NAME     OPTIONS     COST 
 SELECT STATEMENT                        15 
 NESTED LOOPS              
 NESTED LOOPS                            15 
 HASH JOIN                               12 
 Access Predicates 
 CR.EVALUATOR_ID=E.EVALUATOR_ID 
 INDEX  EVALUATOR_PK     UNIQUE SCAN     0 
 Access Predicates 
 E.EVALUATOR_ID=96 
 TABLE ACCESS  CREDIT_REQUEST    BY INDEX ROWID      11 
 INDEX  CRDRQ_DONE_EVAL_TASK_REQ_NDX     SKIP SCAN   10 
 Access Predicates 
 CR.EVALUATOR_ID=96 
 Filter Predicates 
 AND 
 CR.EVALUATOR_ID=96 
 CR.REQUEST_ID<>143462 
 INDEX  REQUESTOR_PK     RANGE SCAN      1 
 Access Predicates 
 CR.REQUEST_ID=R.REQUEST_ID 
 Filter Predicates 
 R.REQUEST_ID<>143462 
 TABLE ACCESS  REQUESTOR     BY INDEX ROWID      3 
 Filter Predicates 
 OR 
 R.SOC_SEC_NUM_TXT='XXXXXXXX' 
 AND 
 R.BIRTH_DT IS NOT NULL 
 R.LAST_NAME_TXT IS NOT NULL 
 R.FIRST_NAME_TXT IS NOT NULL 
 LOWER(R.FIRST_NAME_TXT)='test' 
 LOWER(R.LAST_NAME_TXT)='newprogram' 
 TO_CHAR(INTERNAL_FUNCTION(R.BIRTH_DT),'MM/DD/YYYY')='01/02/1960' 
share|improve this question
    
We can walk you through the process, but we'll need to see the query. Each query is different, but in general, you want to avoid table/clustered index scans as much as possible. Reading the query plans is more art than science :) –  Eric Jan 11 '12 at 19:05
    
I have updated the question with the query –  roymustang86 Jan 11 '12 at 19:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

After refactoring the query comes indexes, so following on from @eric's post:

credit_request:
You're joining this onto requestor on request_id, which I hope is unique. In your where clause you then have a condition on evaluator_id and select client_app_id and personal_flg in the query. So, you probably need a unique index, on credit_request of (request_id, evaulator_id, client_app_id, personal_flg.

By putting the columns you're selecting into the index you avoid the by index rowid, which means that you have selected your values from the index then re-entered the table to pick up more information. If this information is already in the index then there's no need.

You're joining it onto evaluator on evaluator_id, which is included in the first index.

requestor:
This is being joined onto on request_id and your where clause include soc_sec_num_text, lower(first_name_txt), lower(last_name_txt) and birth_dt. So, you need a unique if possible, index on (request_id, soc_sec_num_text) because of the or this is further complicated because you should really have an index on as many of the conditions as possible. You're also selecting requestor_type_iud.

In this case to avoid a functional index, with many columns, I'd index on (request_id, soc_sec_num_text, birth_dt ) if you have the space, time and inclination then adding lower(first_name_txt)... etc to this may improve the speed depending on how selective the column is. This means that if there are far more values in for instance, first_name_txt than birth_dt you'd be better of putting this in front of birth_dt in the index so your query has less to scan if it's a non-unique index.

You notice that I haven't added the selected column into this index as you're already going to have to go into the table so you gain nothing by adding it.

evaluator:
This is only being joined on evaluator_id so you need a unique, if possible, index on this column.

share|improve this answer

As a quick update to your query, you're going to want to refactor it to something like this:

SELECT
    cr.client_app_id,
    cr.personal_flg,
    r.requestor_type_id 
FROM 
    credit_request cr
    inner join requestor r on
        cr.request_id = r.request_id
    inner join evaluator e on
        cr.evaluator_id = e.evaluator_id
WHERE 
    cr.evaluator_id = 96
    and cr.request_id != 143462
    and (r.soc_sec_num_txt = 'xxxxxxxxx' 
        or (
            lower(r.first_name_txt) = 'test'
            and lower(r.last_name_txt) = 'newprogram'
            and r.birth_dt = date '1960-01-02'
        )
    )

Firstly, joining by commas creates a cross join, which you want to avoid. Luckily, Oracle's smart enough to do it as an inner join since you specified join conditions, but you want to be explicit so you don't accidentally miss something.

Secondly, your is not null checks are pointless--if a column is null, and = check you do will return false for that row. In fact, any comparison with a null column, even null = null returns false. You can try this with select 1 where null = null and select 1 where null is null. Only the second one returns.

Thirdly, Oracle's smart enough to compare dates with the ISO format (at least the last time I used it, it was). You can just do r.birth_dt = date '1960-01-02' and avoid doing a string format on that column.

That being said, your query isn't exactly poorly written in terms of egregious performance mistakes. What you want to look for are indices. Does evaluator have one on evaluator_id? Does credit_request? What types are they? Typically, evaluator will have a one on the PK evaluator_id, and credit_request will have one for that column, as well. The same for requestor and the request_id columns.

Other indices you may want to consider are all the fields you're using to filter. In this case, soc_sec_num_txt, first_name_txt, last_name_txt, birth_dt. Consider putting a multi-column index on the latter three, and a single column index on the soc_sec_num_txt column.

share|improve this answer
3  
You can just do r.birth_dt = '1960-01-02' That will default to converting the string to a date based on NLS_DATA_FORMAT. So whether it works or not would depend on a setting that can vary from one session to another. One could use either a date constant using the date keyword, like r.birth_dt = date '1960-01-02' or to_date with an explicit format like r.birth_dt = to_date('1960-01-02', 'YYYY-MM-DD') –  Shannon Severance Jan 11 '12 at 19:35
    
@ShannonSeverance - Thanks! Been awhile since I've worked in Oracle. Appreciate the correction. I edited the post. And I learned something today :) –  Eric Jan 11 '12 at 19:38
    
Typically, evaluator will have a clustered on the PK evaluator_id, and credit_request will have a non-clustered. Are you talking about clustered indexes? If so, that is a SQL Server term. Oracle clustered tables are completely different, and are not the default, and in my experience are not typical. (Edited to include the negative needed to be correct.) –  Shannon Severance Jan 11 '12 at 19:38
    
@ShannonSeverance - Thanks again--been about 2-3 years since I worked in Oracle. Been doing lots of SQL Server of late. –  Eric Jan 11 '12 at 19:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.