Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to make a db_queryf function for my database abstraction. It will work somewhat like sqlite3_mprintf from SQLite: db_queryf('select * from pages where name=%q', $_GET['name']), where %q will produce a properly escaped string. What is the proper way of making printf-like functions in PHP? Is there any helper functions for that or I should parse it myself?

share|improve this question
    
It is possible that you'd like to check func_get_args, func_get_arg and func_num_args, but you'd have to parse the query string searching for %like placeholders, and it will possibly interfere where you'd want to use a name LIKE '%foo% query. –  Carlos Campderrós Jun 19 '12 at 11:19
    
very viable, and underrated question... it's a shame the answers are ueseless though :( have you found a solution for your problem? –  Andreas Grapentin Nov 25 '13 at 19:24

4 Answers 4

okay, since I had exactly the same problem, I gave it a shot, and it seems to work quite nicely.

The following function sits inside a database wrapping class, and expects to be called like printf, where %% is transformed to a literal %, %e marks a string argument to be escaped, and %u marks a string argument to taken as-is.

LOGDB is a second database wrapping class, that is responsible for catching and logging all kinds of errors.

  public static function query($format)
  {
    $query = $format . ' ';

    $argc = func_num_args();
    $argv = func_get_args();

    $index_query = 0;
    $index_args = 1;

    while (($index_query = strpos($query, '%', $index_query)) !== false)
      {
        switch ($query[$index_query + 1])
          {
          case '%':
            $query = substr_replace($query, '', $index_query, 1);
            $index_query++;
            break;
          case 'e':
            if ($index_args >= $argc)
              {
                LOG::failedQuery($format, "not enough arguments for format");
                return false;
              }
            $query = substr_replace($query, DB::escape($argv[$index_args]), $index_query, 2);
            $index_query += strlen($argv[$index_args]);
            $index_args++;
            break;
          case 'u':
            if ($index_args >= $argc)
              {
                LOG::failedQuery($format, "not enough arguments for format");
                return false;
              }
            $query = substr_replace($query, $argv[$index_args], $index_query, 2);
            $index_query += strlen($argv[$index_args]);
            $index_args++;
            break;
          default:
            LOG::failedQuery($format, "unknown control sequence '%" . $query[$index_query + 1] . "'");
            return false;
          }
      }

    if ($index_args != $argc)
      {
        LOG::failedQuery($format, "too many arguments for format");
        return false;
      }

    $res = mysqli_query(self::$handle, $query);
    if (!$res)
      LOGDB::failedQuery($query, mysqli_error(self::$handle));

    return $res;
  }

Note: the code is mostly untested, chances are, it contains a bunch of bugs. use with caution :)

share|improve this answer

Use PDO prepared statements. Replacing into the string isn't good enough, you should be sanitizing.

share|improve this answer

I am confused... (s)printf plainly allready exists, and you probably want to use SQLite3Stmt::bindValue more for this, unless you want to end up in escaping / sql-injection hell..

share|improve this answer

sprintf()

sprintf('select * from pages where name=\'%s\'', $_GET['name']);

Its very important, that you sanitize everything in $_GET, before you use it!

share|improve this answer
    
The whole point of db_query is not to sanitize everything. For example, db_query('select * where name=%q', "' and 1=1 --"); will produce select * where name='\' and 1=1 --'. Page with such a name obviously doesn't exist so the query will do no harm. –  lamefun Jan 11 '12 at 20:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.