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Suppose we have the following table data:

ID   parent    stage     submitted
1      1         1           1
2      1         2           1
3      1         3           0
4      1         4           0
5      5         1           1
6      5         2           1
7      5         3           1
8      5         4           1

As you can see we have 2 groups (that have the same parent). I want to select the latter stage that is submitted. In the above example i want to select the ID`s 2 and 8. I am completely lost so if anyone can help it will be appreciated a lot. :)

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Not sure I understand this: "i want to select the ID`s 2 and 8". Can you explain? –  Adam V May 19 '09 at 13:07
    
Ah, I get it - you want the highest stage value for each parent where submitted = 1. Sorry about that, I'm on board now. –  Adam V May 19 '09 at 13:10
    
Exactly Adam V, from the data i want a select statement that has as result that returns ids 2 and 8, the rows that from their common parent has the higher stage and its submitted. (not by selecting 2 and 8 explicit :P) –  Constandinos May 19 '09 at 13:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted
SELECT T.ID, T.PARENT, T.STAGE 
from
   T, 
   (
      select PARENT, MAX( STAGE) MAX_STAGE 
      from T
      where SUBMITTED = 1
      GROUP BY PARENT 
   ) M
where 
   T.STAGE = M.MAX_STAGE 
   AND T.PARENT = M.PARENT

Explanation: First, isolate the max stage for each group with submitted = 1 (the inner select). Then, join the result with the real table, to filter out the records with no max stage.

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Excellent Catalin, fast response and with very good explanation. –  Constandinos May 19 '09 at 13:18
Select Parent, max(Id)
From tbl t
Inner Join
(
    Select Parent, max(Stage) as Stage
    from tbl t
    Where Submitted = 1
    Group by Parent
) submitted
on t.Parent = submitted.parent and
    t.stage = submitted.stage
Group by Parent
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Don't you need to specify "t.parent" rather than just "parent" in the outer group by/select parts? –  araqnid May 19 '09 at 13:17

This should do it:

SELECT
     T1.id,
     T1.parent,
     T1.stage,
     T1.submitted
FROM
     Some_Table T1
LEFT OUTER JOIN Some_Table T2 ON
     T2.parent = T1.parent AND
     T2.submitted = 1 AND
     T2.stage > T1.stage
WHERE
     T1.submitted = 1 AND
     T2.id IS NULL
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+1 just for using a join and no aggregation, although I prefer to make the anti-join explicit: select id, parent, stage from t where submitted = 1 and not exists (select 1 from t t2 where t2.parent = t.parent and t2.submitted = 1 and t2.stage > t.stage); –  araqnid May 19 '09 at 13:25
    
Do the query plans tend to be the same with the NOT EXISTS? Since it's a correlated subquery it seems like it would take a pretty big performance hit for large sets of data. –  Tom H. May 19 '09 at 13:28
    
Oracle, Postgres and SQL Server each produce a very similar join plan for both queries, but qualify the "not exists" version as being an anti-join, whereas the former version has a filter outside a left join. So I'm inclined to say that "not exists" is communicating the query intent better--- but haven't tried any large data sets. –  araqnid May 19 '09 at 13:40
SELECT * FROM Table WHERE ID = 2 OR ID = 8

Is this what you want?

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No i am sorry. see my comment i am trying to explain a bit better. –  Constandinos May 19 '09 at 13:14

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