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My question is twofold:

  1. I have a vector of objects and a vector of integers, I want to iterate on my object vector in the order of the integer vector:

    meaning if {water,juice,milk,vodka} is my object vector and {1,0,3,2} is my integer vector I wish to have a const iterator for my object vector that will have juice for the first object, water for the second, vodka and last milk.

    is there a simple way of doing this?

  2. suppose I have a function returning const iterator (itr) to a unknown (but accessible) vector meaning, I can use (itr.getvalue()) but i don't have the size of the vector I'm iterating on, is there a way to make a while loop and know the end or the vector by iterator means?

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Which language are you using? –  Tom Jan 11 '12 at 22:17
    
One question per question, please. –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Jan 11 '12 at 22:25

4 Answers 4

Others have already covered number 1. For number 2, it basically comes down to a question of what you're willing to call an iterator. It's certainly possible to define a class that will do roughly what you're asking for -- a single object that both represents a current position and has some way of figuring out when it's been incremented as much as possible.

Most people would call that something like a range rather than an iterator though. You'd have to use it somewhat differently from a normal iterator. Most iterators are used by explicitly comparing them to another iterator representing the end of the range. In this case, you'd pass two separate positions when you created the "iterator" (one for the beginning/current position, the other for the end position) and you'd overload operator bool (for the most obvious choice) to indicate whether the current position had been incremented past the end. You'd use it something like: while (*my_iterator++) operator_on(*my_iterator); -- quite a bit different from using a normal iterator.

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Question 1:

Omitting most of the boilerplate needed for a proper iterator, the following is how it would work:

template<typename Container, typename Iterator>
class index_iterator
{
public:
  typedef typename Container::value_type value_type;
  index_iterator(Container& c, Iterator iter):
    container(c),
    iterator(iter)
  {
  }
  value_type& operator*() { return container[*iterator]; }
  index_iterator& operator++() { ++iterator; return *this; }
  bool operator==(index_iterator const& other)
  {
    return &container == &other.container && iterator == other.iterator;
  }
  // ...
private:
  Container& container;
  Iterator iterator;
};

template<typename C, typename I>
 index_iterator<C, I> indexer(C& container, I iter)
{
  return index_iterator<C, I>(container, iter);
}

Then you could write e.g.

std::vector<std::string> vs;
std::vector<int> vi
// fill vs and vi
std::copy(indexer(vs, vi.begin()),
          indexer(vs, vi.end()),
          std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, " "));

Question 2:

No, it isn't possible.

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And there it is. :) Except s/\*begin/\*iterator/. And you're going to need to support C being a template type, methinks... –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Jan 11 '12 at 22:35
    
Thanks for noting the iterator name error. There is no need to do something for C since class template instantiations are just ordinary classes. –  celtschk Jan 11 '12 at 22:55
    
Oh yes, you're passing an instantiation aren't you. OK. –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Jan 11 '12 at 23:00

I wish to have a const iterator for my object vector that will have juice for the first object

typedef std::vector<Drink> Drinks;
Drinks drinks;
drinks.push_back("water");
drinks.push_back("juice");
drinks.push_back("milk");
drinks.push_back("vodka");
Drinks::const_iterator i = drinks.begin();

const iterator (itr) to a unknown (but accessible) vector

Drinks::const_iterator itr = some_func();
while (itr != drinks.end()) {
   doStuff;
   ++itr;
}
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Mmm, no... That's a normal iteration. (a) You didn't provide some_func's definition, which is what the OP wants; (b) there is no definition of some_func that can yield a Drinks::const_iterator that has different behaviour from any other Drinks::const_iterator. –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Jan 11 '12 at 22:34

1

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

std::vector<std::string>  foods{"water", "juice", "milk", "vodka"};
std::vector<unsigned int> indexes{1,0,3,2};

for (int i : indexes) { // ranged-for; use normal iteration if you must
   std::cout << foods[i] << " ";
}

// Output: juice water vodka milk 

Live demo

If you really want to wrap this behaviour into a single iterator for foods, this can be done but it gets a bit more complicated.


2

suppose I have a function returning const iterator (itr) to a unknown (but accessible) vector meaning, I can use (itr.getvalue()) but i don't have the size of the vector I'm iterating on, is there a way to make a while loop and know the end or the vector by iterator means?

If you don't have the vector for its size, and you don't have the vector's end iterator then, no, you can't. You can't reliably iterate over anything with just one iterator; you need a pair or a distance.

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