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I am sitting here finding myself writing a recursive call for C# to write a RegistryKey.

This is something I could hard code easily enough, but I'd to do it recursively.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using Microsoft.Win32;

private const string regKeyPath = @"Software\Apps\jp2code\net\TestApp";

static void Main() {
  string[] split = regKeyPath.Split('\\');
  RegistryKey key = null;
  try {
    keyMaker(Registry.LocalMachine, split);
  } finally {
    if (key != null) {
      key.Close();
    }
  }
  // continue on with Application.Run(new Form1());
}

So, keyMaker is what I want to be my recursive function.

private static void keyMaker(RegistryKey key, string[] path) {
  string subKey = null;
  string[] subKeyNames = key.GetSubKeyNames();
  foreach (var item in subKeyNames) {
    if (path[0] == item) {
      subKey = item;
    }
  }
  RegistryKey key2 = null;
  try {
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(subKey)) {
      key2 = key.CreateSubKey(subKey);
    } else {
      key2 = key.OpenSubKey(subKey);
    }
    keyMaker(key2, &path[1]); // <= NOTE! Not allowed/defined in C#
  } finally {
    key2.Close();
  }
}

So, I can't simply pass the array starting with the next element of the array.

Is there a neat way to do this in C#?

The Registry bit has nothing to do with the problem but to add my real world problem to an array task.

share|improve this question
    
not sure if it's beneficial to you, but there is a class called ArraySegment that you could use to pass the remainder of the path array (without allocating new arrays, and allows you to get back to the original) – mpen Jan 11 '12 at 22:44
up vote 3 down vote accepted

A simple way to be to change your method's signature to include the starting index:

void keyMaker(RegistryKey key, string[] path, int startIndex)

Apart from that, you can use a LinkedList<T> or a Queue<T> instead of an array, and use LinkedList<T>.RemoveFirst() or Queue<T>.Dequeue() methods to remove their head elements.

But you don't need recursion to solve this at all (unless this is an exercise).

share|improve this answer
    
It is only an exercise in that I did not see a way to do this using string[] array. I never thought of LinkedList<T> or Queue<T>. Good ideas! – jp2code Jan 11 '12 at 23:02
1  
K.I.S.S. - I just added the index value. – jp2code Jan 12 '12 at 14:34

Don't do it recursively is all. Here's how I'd write it, given that a key is simply returned by CreateSubKey if it exists:

private static void keyMaker(RegistryKey key, string[] path) {
    foreach(string subkey in path) {
        key = key.CreateSubKey(subkey);
    }
}

If closing them immediately is important (I doubt it):

private static void keyMaker(RegistryKey key, string[] path) {
    RegistryKey lastKey = key;

    foreach(string subkey in path) {
        key = key.CreateSubKey(subkey);
        lastKey.Close();
        lastKey = key;
    }

    lastKey.Close();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like this. It might be the way I go, so don't change it. Still, I'm curious how to pass an array, given an array. – jp2code Jan 11 '12 at 22:57

Although I'd prefer passing the index like @Groo suggested, another possibility is to use an IEnumerable<string> instead of a string[] and use LINQ. In the recursive call, you could pass path.Skip(1), which will remove the first element from the list (or, more precisely, return a new IEnumerable<string> which starts on the second element).

share|improve this answer
    
LINQ - I always enjoy finding a place to try out some of that! – jp2code Jan 11 '12 at 23:03

Editted in response to LOL.

keyMaker(Registry.LocalMachine, ref split, 0);
....
private static void keyMaker(RegistryKey key, ref string[] path, int index) {
if( index > path.length - 1 ) return;
....
if (path[index] == item) {
....
keyMaker(key2, ref path, ++index);
....
share|improve this answer
    
LOL - you used the illegal &path in your call to keyMaker, but I understand what you meant by the index. – jp2code Jan 11 '12 at 22:56
1  
You don't need to use ref. A reference is passed regardless. – Ryan O'Hara Jan 12 '12 at 0:05

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