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Question concerning the JMM and the semantics concerning volatile fields that are written to in a synchronized block, but read un-synchronized.

In an initial version of the below code, I was not synchronizing access since it was unnecessary for earlier requirements (and abusing a self assignment this.cache = this.cache ensured volatile write semantics). Certain requirements have changed, necessitating synchronization to ensure that duplicate updates are not sent out. The question I have is does the synchronization block preclude requiring the self assignment of the volatile field?

  // Cache of byte[] data by row and column.
  private volatile byte[][][] cache;

  public byte[] getData(int row, int col)
  {
    return cache[row][col];
  }

  public void updateData(int row, int col, byte[] data)
  {
    synchronized(cache)
    {
      if (!Arrays.equals(data,cache[row][col]))
      {
        cache[row][col] = data;

        // Volatile write.
        // The below line is intentional to ensure a volatile write is
        // made to the array, since access via getData is unsynchronized.
        this.cache = this.cache;

        // Notification code removed
        // (mentioning it since it is the reason for synchronizing).
      }
    }
  }

Without synchronization, I believe that the self assignment volatile write is technically necessary (although the IDE flags it as having no effect). With the synchronized block, I think it is still necessary (since the read is unsynchronized), but I just want to confirm since it looks ridiculous in the code if it is not actually required. I am not sure if there are any guarantees that I am unaware of between the end of a synchronized block and a volatile read.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, you still need the volatile write, according to Java Memory Model. There is no synchronization order from unlocking cache to a subsequent volatile read of cache: unlock -> volatileRead does not guarantee visibility. You need either unlock -> lock or volatileWrite -> volatileRead.

However, real JVMs have much stronger memory guarantees. Usually unlock and volatileWrite have the same memory effect (even if they are on different variables); same as lock and volatileRead.

So we have a dilemma here. The typical recommendation is that you should strictly follow the spec. Unless you have very broad knowledge of the matter. For example, a JDK code may employ some tricks that are not theoretically correct; but the code is targeting a specific JVM and the author is an expert.

The relative overhead of the extra volatile write doesn't seem to be that big anyway.

Your code is correct and efficient; however it's outside of typical patterns; I would tweak it a little bit like:

  private final    byte[][][] cacheF = new ...;  // dimensions fixed?
  private volatile byte[][][] cacheV = cacheF;

  public byte[] getData(int row, int col)
  {
    return cacheV[row][col];
  }

  public void updateData(int row, int col, byte[] data)
  {
    synchronized(cacheF)
    {
      if (!Arrays.equals(data,cacheF[row][col]))
      {
        cacheF[row][col] = data;

        cacheV = cacheF; 
      }
    }
  }
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Thank you for the answer, it is clear and confirms what I suspected. The advice concerning having two cache variables is also probably a good idea since it avoids having someone remove the self assignment (despite comments warning not to). –  increment1 Jan 12 '12 at 19:00

An index write to a volatile array actually has no memory effects. That is, if you have already instantiated the array, having the field declared as volatile won't give you the memory semantics your looking for when assigning to elements within the array.

In other words

private volatile byte[][]cache = ...;
cache[row][col] = data;

Has the same memory semantics as

private final byte[][]cache = ...;
cache[row][col] = data;

Because of this you must synchronize on all reads and writes to the array. And when I say 'same memory semantics' I mean there is no guarantee that threads will read the most up to date value of cache[row][col]

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I had the same feeling, but since he later writes to the volatile array, and since volatile has a "cascading effect", on everything that was written before the write to the volatile field, I think there is no visibility problem, in fact. It's very fragile though, and would be much clearer and robust with a synchronized getData. –  JB Nizet Jan 11 '12 at 23:05
1  
The problem though is there is no happens-before relationship between the non-volatile store and the volatile-store of this.cache = this.cache –  John Vint Jan 11 '12 at 23:09
1  
There is one, because the non-volatile write to cache[row][col] is made before the volatile write to cache, in the same thread. And the volatile write happen-before the read of the cache. –  JB Nizet Jan 11 '12 at 23:18
1  
But since the cache instance is already published other threads can read that index of the cache after normal load and read a stale value until the volatile write –  John Vint Jan 11 '12 at 23:28
    
I understand that there is no guarantee with volatile array elements, which is the reason for the self assignment later. My understanding is that the volatile self assignment will ensure that other threads see the updated cache value (after the self assignment). I am not worried if they very temporarily see the stale value. My overall question was if I still need this self assignment with the synchronized block or if the end of the synchronized block has any interaction with volatile fields read in the block (from your answer and my own understanding, I assume not, just wanted to verify). –  increment1 Jan 12 '12 at 0:26

The self assignment makes sure that another thread will read the array reference that was set, and not another array reference. But you might have one thread modifying the array while another thread reads it.

Both the reads and the writes to the array should be synchronized. Also, I wouldn't blindly store and return arrays to/from a cache. An arrays is a mutable, non-threadsafe data structure and any thread might corrupt the cache by mutating the array. You should consider creating defensive copies, and/or return an unmodifiable list rather than a byte array.

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Thank you for the tips, and I agree that in an ideal world, defensive copies would be a good thing to make, but the arrays being cached here are not going to be modified so the performance gain over not making copies is preferable (and if that changes the cache could be wrapped by an implementation that returns defensive copies). I am reasonably sure that the code as written is correct, I am just not sure if I can remove the volatile self assignment or not now that I have added partial synchronization (per my comment on another answer, I believe I still need it, just want to verify that). –  increment1 Jan 12 '12 at 0:50
    
+1 for the answer, but I accepted the other answer since it more directly answers the question. –  increment1 Jan 12 '12 at 18:57

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