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I need help in centering one DIV withing a DIV.

I want to have one container DIV that is auto width to take up the whole width of the screen (lets call it headerContainer.

Within headerContainer, I want 3 more DIVs:

  • A Left DIV (400px wide)
  • A Center DIV (100px wide)
  • A right DIV (200px wide).

I want the center DIV directly in the middle of the screen. Right now I can only get it to center between the left and right DIV.

Thanks for any help.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

CSS:

.leftDiv{
  float: left;
  width: 400px;
}
.rightDiv{
  float: right;
  width: 200px;
}
.centerDiv{
  width: 100px;
  margin: 0 auto;
}

HTML:

<div>
   <div class="leftDiv">left</div>
   <div class="rightDiv">right</div>
   <div class="centerDiv">center</div>
</div>

DEMO:

Code: http://jsfiddle.net/Xxwrm/6/

Fullscreen: http://jsfiddle.net/Xxwrm/6/show

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This works.

.headerContainer{
  width:auto !important;
}
.leftDiv{
  float:left;
  width:400px;
}
.rightDiv{
  float:right;
  width:200px;
}
.centerDiv{
  display:inline;
  width:100px;
  margin-left:auto;
  margin-right:auto;
}

.

<div class="headerContainer">
 <div class="leftDiv"></div>
 <div class="centerDiv"></div>
 <div class="rightDiv"></div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
You're code does not work. rightDiv is wrapping to new line. See: jsfiddle.net/Xxwrm/show –  Sparky Jan 12 '12 at 0:37
    
It worked for me! –  Ibanez Jan 12 '12 at 0:38
    
I was adding the right div in after the center div and this was causing the right div to disappear. You must add the right div before adding the center div. –  Ibanez Jan 12 '12 at 0:44
    
@Ibanez, yes, the order of the div's is important which is why this answer is not working properly as Travis has presented it. The other posted answers have fixed his oversight and my posted answer removed some unnecessary CSS. –  Sparky Jan 12 '12 at 0:55
    
@Sparky672: Your code has "div { display: block; }" in it. This code works, you might want to fully inspect your elements before critiquing. –  Travis J Jan 12 '12 at 4:35

What you could do is add another div at the end which makes both sides equal, and set visibility: hidden; (not display: none;); this way it would centre the middle div.

For example in this case you'd have one @ 400px, another @ 100px, another @ 200px and another one, hidden, @ 200px.

Regards, Richard

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<div class="headerContainer">
 <div class="leftDiv">left</div>
 <div class="rightDiv">right</div>
 <div class="centerDiv">center</div>
</div>

This HTML with this CSS will work. I colored the DIV's to make it obvious.

.headerContainer{
  width:auto;
}
.leftDiv{
  float:left;
  width:400px;
  background:pink;
}
.centerDiv{
  width:100px;
/*
  margin-left:auto;
  margin-right:auto;
*/
  margin:0 auto;
  background:cyan;
}
.rightDiv{
  float:right;
  width:200px;
  background:lightgray;
}

However, if the screen is not 700px wide, you will get some wrapping.

Here is a fiddle for it, too: http://jsfiddle.net/johnpapa/9bN2p/

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Essentially you fixed Travis's broken code, but I see no good reason to put !important on the .headerContainer width, especially when it's already the default div behavior. Please explain this. And CSS shorthand could be used on the margin for .centerDiv, margin: 0 auto; See: jsfiddle.net/Xxwrm/4/show –  Sparky Jan 12 '12 at 0:44
    
@Sparky672 - I updated the post to show the shortened margin syntax, and left the old style in their commented out. I also removed the !important because it really is not needed here at all. "!important" is a way to tell the browser to apply this style even if another rule tries to override it. I only apply it when I see a conflict. Here is a post on the topic: webdesign.about.com/od/css/f/blcssfaqimportn.htm –  John Papa Jan 12 '12 at 13:45
    
Thanks. I understand the meaning of !important, I was simply questioning its unneeded usage for this case. –  Sparky Jan 12 '12 at 16:12
    
!important is used for browser compatibility with IE, otherwise the width:auto will not be used and will not resize properly if changed dynamically. –  Travis J Jan 12 '12 at 19:35
    
@TravisJ, you are mistaken. It's a hacky way to change the order of cascading precedence; that's nothing specifically to do with IE compatibility. Properly constructed CSS should rarely need !important as the precedence is correct from the start. The code above works dynamically in IE without using !important or width:auto;. Again, see: http://jsfiddle.net/Xxwrm/4/show –  Sparky Jan 12 '12 at 20:41

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