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I noticed some strange looking statements when I viewed some c code in Disassembly. The statements occurred just before a call to a function. So I removed all code from my program just leaving an empty main function like this -

I have an empty main function like this -

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    return 0;
}

Yet when I looked at Disassembly the assembly statements in question were still present. So does anyone know what these statements are for?

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
00411350  push        ebp  
00411351  mov         ebp,esp  
00411353  sub         esp,0C0h  
00411359  push        ebx  
0041135A  push        esi  
0041135B  push        edi  
0041135C  lea         edi,[ebp-0C0h]  
00411362  mov         ecx,30h  
00411367  mov         eax,0CCCCCCCCh  
0041136C  rep stos    dword ptr es:[edi]  
return 0;
0041136E  xor         eax,eax  
}

The statements in question are

00411362  mov         ecx,30h  
00411367  mov         eax,0CCCCCCCCh  
0041136C  rep stos    dword ptr es:[edi]  
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possible duplicate of Why do we allocate 12 bytes for each variable? –  Hans Passant Jan 12 '12 at 0:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That code fills the stack frame with a pattern (0xcc). exc holds the number of words to fill, 'eax' is the pattern. The Intel architecture rep opcode is "Repeat String Operation Prefix". Most likely it is boilerplate code that would have meaning in a complete function (maybe clearing out local variables, creating deliberately bad data for uninitialized variables). Here the stack frame is destroyed immediately on exit and the code is useless.

Nothing to worry about.

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In Debug builds, Visual C++ compiler fills the stack space allocated for local variables with the 0xCC pattern, so that uninitialized variables can be easily recognized when debugging. There are some other magic values used by the compiler and/or OS to help debugging; check this list on Wikipedia.

I am not sure why the compiler decided to allocate stack space in this function; possibly it's something specific to the handling of the main function.

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They're some redundant code which is enabled in Debug builds. It looks like for some error-checks. They don't be emitted in Release builds.

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Looks to me like it is writing over the stack as the program terminates... this makes sense as a security precaution in case any sensitive data is left there as garbage.

EDIT: As the comments have pointed out, this appears to be in the setup code so this probably isn't the reason (I suspect it is for debugging purposes). However I've left the answer here for reference as it may still be relevant in other situations.

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This doesn't particularly look like a security thing. It looks more like an attempt to set a buffer of "bad" data. Probably so that it's obvious when the program's trying to read uninitialized data. (When you see 0xcccccccc in your variables, it's likely you messed up. And i'm pretty sure if you tried to use that value as a pointer, something would break.) –  cHao Jan 12 '12 at 0:25
    
Does know one know for sure why the compiler puts it here? This code is in every single main function so there must some legit reason for it. And I dont think it has anything to do with overwriting the stack as the program terminates --- this code is placed before function parameters are placed on the stack and the function gets called. –  Jim_CS Jan 12 '12 at 0:36
    
Yeah...this is part of the startup code, not the cleanup. Like i said, it's probably for debugging purposes, so that reads from uninitialized local variables become more obvious. –  cHao Jan 12 '12 at 0:37

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