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If I have code like this:

io.sockets.on('connection', function (socket) {
    // setup listeners for this socket          
    setup_socket_events(socket);      
});

function setup_socket_events(socket)
{     
    socket.on('disconnect', function(){event_disconnect(socket);});         
}

function event_disconnect(socket)
{   
    console.log("disconnect");
}

When the socket disconnects, is this a memory leak, and if so, why and how do you stop it?

UPDATE: Trying the following code creates a cyclic assertion from assertvarnish

var assertvanish = require('assertvanish');
io.sockets.on('connection', function (socket) {
    // setup listeners for this socket      
    setup_socket_events(socket);    
});

function setup_socket_events(socket)
{
    socket.on('disconnect', event_disconnect(socket) ); 
}
function event_disconnect(socket)
{

    return function() { 
    console.log("disconnect");
        // do something with socket
        assertvanish(socket, 5000);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What, specifically, makes you wonder about a memory leak? –  T.J. Crowder Jan 12 '12 at 0:32
    
Also, note that your on call can just be: io.sockets.on('connection', setup_socket_events);. There's no need for the intermediary function. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 12 '12 at 0:33
    
don't I need to pass socket to setup_socket_events? The main reason I'm worried about a memory leak is that I have one somewhere and have simplified code as much as possible to this point. Using assertvanish(socket, 10000); in event_disconnect I will see a cyclic memory leak. –  crickeys Jan 12 '12 at 0:36
    
"don't I need to pass socket to setup_socket_events?" Just as io.sockets.on passes socket to your anonymous callback function in your example, it will directly pass the socket to setup_socket_events if you specify that as the callback function instead. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 12 '12 at 8:29
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1 Answer

There is no memory leak. You are saying that you are using assertvanish. I think that assertvanish(socket, 10000) just says that socket is not deleted after 10s, which is ok, because you want to keep your socket alive forever, right?

share|improve this answer
    
Why? What possible difference does it make, other than to make it impossible to reuse setup_socket_events and event_disconnect elsewhere? The OP isn't using the closure(s), so that's no gain. But the OP's code has the advantage that the functions have names (help your tools help you) and are reusable. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 12 '12 at 0:32
    
You are right about reusing, but I don't see where you would be able to reuse functions setup_socket_events and event_disconnect...perhaps if you are opening multiple sockets and want all of them to have the same events and behave the same on disconnect? Other than that, I would definitely write the code in the second form, because you can understand it in 2 seconds, while it took me 20 seconds to see what is going on with those function calls...but it is just a personal preference, I suppose. –  Aleksandar Vučetić Jan 12 '12 at 0:44
1  
I used setup_socket_events because in reality that function will have a lot more things that it does, I just simplified it for this example. In a large project I find it harder to have all the anonymous function calls. See my new answer for some more insight. –  crickeys Jan 12 '12 at 0:52
    
I've updated my answer after your explanation in the question. Also, removed inappropriate suggestion for using anonymous function calls instead of named functions. –  Aleksandar Vučetić Jan 12 '12 at 1:07
    
If I'm hitting event_disconnect then that means the user has disconnected, so I DON'T want to keep the socket alive forever. –  crickeys Jan 12 '12 at 1:43
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