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If I have the following code:

struct someStruct
{
  int x;
  int y;
}

class someClass
{
  public:
    someStruct m_member;

    alias      m_x = m_member.x; // I am aware alias is not a keyword and even if it was, I cannot assign it a value like this
    alias      m_y = m_member.y; // I am aware alias is not a keyword and even if it was, I cannot assign it a value like this
}

Can I give aliases to m_member.x and m_member.y without incurring the extra storage cost of a reference (which is the same as a pointer)? Something similar to a typedef?

share|improve this question
    
Nod. Such an 'alias' keyword would certainly be valuable when you want to deprecate an old name without breaking existing code or to transparently compose one data structure of another. D pleasantly has the "alias" keyword, and C++ has "using", but it sadly only works for type names rather than field names. I hope C++ someday adopt D's ability (but it would likely be via the "using" keyword instead of "alias"). –  Dwayne Robinson Jul 24 at 22:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can write inline access functions:

class someClass
{
public:
  someStruct m_member;
  int& mx() { return m_member.x; }
  int& my() { return m_member.y; }
  int const& mx() const { return m_member.x; }
  int const& my() const { return m_member.y; }
};

Then you can access the members as follows:

someClass foo;
foo.mx() = 3;
foo.my() = 2*foo.mx();

It's not exactly the same syntax, but close, and a reasonably good compiler will completely optimize away the inline functions.

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1  
+1 Probably the least of the evils... –  Kerrek SB Jan 12 '12 at 0:52
    
That's a good compromise (+1), I think I can live with this. –  Samaursa Jan 12 '12 at 0:57
1  
+1, but should have const versions too. –  Tony D Jan 12 '12 at 1:06
    
@TonyDelroy: Thanks for pointing out that omission; I've now added them. –  celtschk Jan 12 '12 at 9:33

In this scenario I would just use a reference as it's what they're suited for. If a reference overhead is really too much I would just forgo the alias and use the full expression.

However you could achieve this with a macro (read: evil)

class someClass
{
  public:
    someStruct m_member;
#define m_x m_member.x
#define m_y m_member.y

  ...

#undef m_x
#undef m_y
};

I would highly recommend not doing this though. Like all macros though it has some unintended consequences (could cause incorrect referencing for other valid uses of m_x within the type).

For example

struct s1 {
  int m_x;
};

class someClass {
public:
  someStruct m_member;
#define m_x m_member.x
#define m_y m_member.y

  ...
  void Example(S1& s1) { 
    s1.m_x = 42;  // This wouldn't compile and you'd get terrible error messages
  }
};
share|improve this answer
1  
Note that if you #undef the macros within the class, clients can't use them. But if you don't #undef them, the result is probably worse. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 12 '12 at 0:52
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes I was trying to limit my hack / macro to the smallest possible area :) –  JaredPar Jan 12 '12 at 0:53
    
I think if you're going to overload m_x like that, you're looking to get bitten in any case. –  Carl Norum Jan 12 '12 at 0:53
1  
It's called a "hackro" for a reason. –  Puppy Jan 12 '12 at 0:58

You can just put:

#define m_x m_member.x
#define m_y m_member.y

in there, and it should be fine. It'll only work for code that follows the #define statement in the translation unit, though.

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1  
"it should be fine" Please tell me you are kidding, thats horrible. –  Grizzly Jan 12 '12 at 0:48
    
Do you anticipate any problems doing that? I'm not sure I'd recommend it, but I'm pretty sure it will work. –  Carl Norum Jan 12 '12 at 0:49
1  
In order to use that for every code using those members (they are public afterall) you can't undef the macros, so you may never use m_x or m_y as a variable name (member or otherwise) anywhere else. I wouldn't call possibly breaking completely unrelated code working –  Grizzly Jan 12 '12 at 0:54
1  
And I'm sure you've checked your complete code, including all headers, that nowhere else the identifier m_x or m_y is used, right? And put a big warning in your code to never ever use them, no matter how local the use it. –  celtschk Jan 12 '12 at 0:54

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