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So, we have a table, called timePunches:

CREATE TABLE `timePunches` (
    `punchID` INT(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT COMMENT 'The unique ID of the punch',
    `employeeID` VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL COMMENT 'Who did the punch',
    `punchDATETIME` DATETIME NOT NULL COMMENT 'The time of the punch',
    `punchDTC_LINK` DATETIME NULL DEFAULT NULL COMMENT 'The previous start time for the OUT punch',
    `punchDATECRC` INT(100) NOT NULL COMMENT 'The punch CRC, to prevent hacking',
    `punchDIRECTION` TINYTEXT NOT NULL COMMENT 'What the punch did',
    `punchTOTAL` INT(11) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
    `fullName` TEXT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`punchID`)
)
COLLATE='latin1_swedish_ci'
ENGINE=MyISAM
ROW_FORMAT=DYNAMIC
AUTO_INCREMENT=15825

This table is used for tracking punch times from our employees. Meaning, we track when they punch in and punch out. This table is an audit compliance table, meaning that we do not SELECT/UPDATE records, instead, we SELECT/INSERT them only.

So, this is what happens when a user punches the clock:

  • PUNCH IN: Application sends employeeID (string), punchDATETIME (DateTime), punchDATECRC (int) and punchDTC_LINK (DateTime [null]) to the database via a stored procedure. This stored procedure adds the necessary information to the database, to include triggering an internal function to pull the full name of the user into the same table.

  • PUNCH OUT: Application sends employeeID (string), punchDATETIME (DateTime), punchDATECRC (int) and punchDTC_LINK (DateTime) to the database. The stored procedure adds the necessary information, including the trigger to do the math between both DateTime elements, and fill out the legal name.

As we can see from the above, when the user punches IN, the query looks kind of like this:

INSERT INTO timePunches (punchID, employeeID, punchDATETIME, punchDTC_LINK, punchDATECRC, punchDIRECTION, punchTOTAL) VALUES (15797, 'prumple', '2012-01-11 17:35:10', NULL, -2011509138, 'IN', NULL);

And, when the user punches out, it sends something like this:

INSERT INTO timePunches (punchID, employeeID, punchDATETIME, punchDTC_LINK, punchDATECRC, punchDIRECTION, punchTOTAL) VALUES (15797, 'prumple', '2012-01-11 19:39:52', '2012-01-11 17:35:10', -2011509138, 'OUT', NULL);

So, as we can see, there are 2 elements in the DataTable for this user. One IN and one OUT.

What I need to do, is find out if the user has forgotten to punch OUT. So, let's say that a user punches IN, works all the day long, closes their punch clock w/o clocking out, and then the next day punches IN again. HE then works his full shift, and remembers to punch out this time.

Now, for that situation, we have 2 IN punches, and only 1 OUT punch. I need a way to detect this.

share|improve this question
    
Your example INSERTs are a bit at odds with your table definition: punchID is UNIQUE (because it is a primary key), but two separate INSERTs supply the same value. Also the two INSERTs explicitly supply a value rather than relying on implicit AUTO_INCREMENT behavior. –  pilcrow Jan 12 '12 at 3:37
    
those were examples, not exacts lol. The point was to show what goes in punchDTC_LINK lol –  user674311 Jan 12 '12 at 3:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If I understand correctly, an 'IN' record's corresponding 'OUT' record will match on employeeID (the punch is for the same employee) and the 'IN' DATETIME will match the 'OUT' DTC_LINK.

-- Fetch all 'IN' records without a corresponding 'OUT'
    SELECT tp_in.*
     FROM timePunches tp_in
LEFT JOIN timePunches tp_out
          ON tp_in.employeeID = tp_out.employeeID
             AND
             tp_in.punchDATETIME = tp_out.punchDTC_LINK
    WHERE tp_in.punchDIRECTION = 'IN'
          AND
          tp_out.punchDTC_LINK IS NULL;
share|improve this answer
    
OMGTYVM! Yes, perfect, awesome, totally rocks, you are great! lol. Spent 5 hours trying to figure this out, and you solve it in like no time. THANK YOU SO VERY VERY VERY MUCH! –  user674311 Jan 12 '12 at 5:05

You said "You see, when a user punches in, it populates all of the necessary data, except for the punchDTC_LINK field; this is left as 'null', because that field is used for previous start time. "

That should mean you can just do a WHERE punchDIRECTION = "IN" AND punchDTC_LINK = NULL

share|improve this answer
    
That will only return all the punch IN's. For audit sakes, all of the IN's and OUT's are kept in the DB, not removed during punch out. If i do that select, then it will return all of the IN's regardless of it has a another OUT associated with it. –  user674311 Jan 12 '12 at 1:24
    
I have updated the question to be more clear, sorry for that. Please review when you can, and hopefully we can work this out :) –  user674311 Jan 12 '12 at 1:52

You would left outer join the table to itself:

select
   a.punchId
from
   timePunches a
   left outer join timePunches b on
       a.punchId = b.punchDTC_LINK
where
   b.punchDTC_LINK is null
   and a.punchDirection = 'IN';

This will return the stuff you are looking for, I think.

I edited to add the check for punchDirection of in.

You can also change the select piece to select out a.*, which would get you everything from the record.

Additional Edit:

The code above appears to have solved the original problem but what the real problem is when someone checks in twice in a row, then checks out. In MYSQL, this is an incredibly difficult problem, but in Postgres & Oracle, it is relatively simple, and can be solved with windowing functions. I know that this does not solve your problem, but you can probably work out the problem with a script after the fact. In postgres/oracle, the following would find the records that you are looking for:

select * from
(select
   a.punchId,
   lag(b.punchDTC_LINK,1) over (
      partition by a.employeeId
      order by a.punchDATETIME
   ) prev_link,
   a.punchDTC_LINK cur_link
from
   timePunches a
   left outer join timePunches b on
      a.punchId = b.punchDTC_LINK)
where prev_link is null and cur_link is not null;

Or something similar. I haven't tested it.

As for a script, you could use the following query:

select
   a.punchId,
   a.employeeID,
   a.punchDATETIME,
   a.punchDIRECTION,
   b.punchDATETIME,
   b.punchDIRECTION
from
   timePunches a
   left outer join timePunches b on
       a.punchId = b.punchDTC_LINK
order by a.employeeID, a.punchDATETIME desc;

and by looping over the data, and/or writing a script to loop over the data and find places where the b.punchDIRECTION is null and it is not the first record for a given employee, you will easily be able to find the bad records.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, that didn't work :( That is still returning just the IN's. You see, when a user punches out, the punchDTC_LINK is set to whatever the time was when they punched in. So, when they punch OUT, they actually have TWO records for the day. I need to find out when there is a missing OUT. I.E. they have punched IN, but didn't punch OUT. –  user674311 Jan 12 '12 at 1:39
    
I have updated the question to be more clear, sorry for that. Please review when you can, and hopefully we can work this out :) –  user674311 Jan 12 '12 at 1:52
    
But this did solve the original problem, right, IN's without an out? Just making sure I understand the problem properly. –  Horus Jan 12 '12 at 2:44
    
When i ran that, it returned the IN's, not just the IN's w/o an out. –  user674311 Jan 12 '12 at 3:27
    
Exactly, you are going to have to loop through it programmatically. MySQL does not have as many capabilities in select as postgres, so you have to work around. –  Horus Jan 12 '12 at 16:18

Since you match it up with the last IN, search for the last in and append the OUT to it. But what I honestly don't understand, is why you have to match the IN and out on a single record.

I have had to develop a timekeeping system each day to be paid has to have an IN and an OUT. Our time keeping system has individual recored for each punch IN and OUT. You could search for if current day has two INs in a row OR two OUTs in a row ,then there is a mispunch or if previous day has two INs in a row OR two OUTs in a row OR doesn't start with and IN OR doesn't end without and OUT then there is a mispunch

Update:

I understand that, but why does it have to store the IN punch information in the out punch line? The time for a punch is always always in sequencial order. So if the time has them stored inorder of IN IN or IN OUT that is the easiest way to tell.

Example of what I was suggesting storing it as:

IN 2012-01-08 08.00 AM

IN 2012-01-08 11.00 AM

OUT 2012-01-08 15.00 PM

Your check would be to see if the day has two INs in a row that are in time order as well. If you want to do it your way, then match all of the single INs up with a paired INs and get the not not matched up so basically you would do a Left join of your Only in punches to the ones on the right being INs with OUTs then your list on the left that have null values in the match up would show you your mispunches.

share|improve this answer
    
PUNCH IN = one record; PUNH OUT = another record; so it's two records. The PUNCH OUT needs to look for a PUNCH IN record w/ the same punchDATE_LINK on it, to match it up. So it's not looking on ONE record, but two. –  user674311 Jan 12 '12 at 3:28
    
See the updated section above. –  em3ricasforsale Jan 12 '12 at 3:54

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