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This seems to be legal:

data MagazineInfo = Int String
    deriving (Show)

I am not sure if there is a default data constructor, but the above code compiles.

Why is the above valid Haskell, since I did not explicitly specify a value constructor?

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jan 12 '12 at 1:56

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

    
If you would have tried using this datatype by writing a selector, you would have noticed that there is no Int you could get out... – ShiDoiSi Jan 12 '12 at 5:34

You do have a data constructor there--it's Int. Type names live in a separate namespace from data constructors, which is why you don't get an error even though there happens to be a type also named Int.

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5  
And it's common for the data constructor name to be the same as the type name in cases, like this, where there is only one construtor. data MagazineInfo = MagazineInfo String – Aaron McDaid Jan 12 '12 at 1:59
5  
There is also, however, such a thing as empty types—but indeed the poster's example isn't one. Empty types are used in combination with some advanced type system techniques. – Luis Casillas Jan 12 '12 at 5:07
4  
Of course, for the single-constructor, single-item cases, newtype is preferred over data. – Dan Burton Jan 12 '12 at 7:01
3  
@DanBurton: Unless you want a distinguished ⊥. – ehird Jan 12 '12 at 19:43

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