Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sometimes it's nice to start over. In C++ I can employ this following simple manoeuvre:

{

    T x(31, Blue, false);

    x.~T();                        // enough with the old x

    ::new (&x) T(22, Brown, true); // in with the new!

    // ...
}

At the end of the scope, the destructor will run once again and all seems well. (Let's also say T is a bit special and doesn't like being assigned, let alone swapped.) But something tells me that it's not always without risk to destroy everything and try again. Is there a possible catch with this approach?

share|improve this question
7  
Why the heck would you want to do this? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 12 '12 at 2:58
7  
What's wrong with just x = T(22, Brown, true);? –  Karl Knechtel Jan 12 '12 at 2:59
25  
It's well known idiom. 31 and 22 are ages, Blue and Brown - color of the eyes, false and true - either love, but most likely breasts. Bottom line, somewhere along the lines (of your code) your new girlfriend will become x too. –  Petr Budnik Jan 12 '12 at 3:01
11  
@Xeo, You obviously didn't see author's comments next to code. Not to mention his choice of local variable name and the fact that he subconsciously ALREADY prepared to fail - he is creating new girlfriend at the old one's address... How silly is that? –  Petr Budnik Jan 12 '12 at 3:12
16  
@AzzA: You're right, maybe I am subconsciously treating objects like women... –  Kerrek SB Jan 12 '12 at 3:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 24 down vote accepted

I think the only way to make this really safe to use is to require the called constructor to be noexcept, for example by adding a static_assert:

static_assert(noexcept(T(22, Brown, true)), "The constructor must be noexcept for inplace reconstruction");
T x(31, Blue, false);
x.~T();
::new (&x) T(22, Brown, true);

Of course this will only work for C++11.

share|improve this answer
7  
Very nice use of noexcept - I never realized it could be used interrogatively! –  Kerrek SB Jan 12 '12 at 3:23
    
You could package the static_assert, pseudo-destructor call, and placement new all into one reconstruct function, using perfect forwarding for the last step. But I still think it's awful form. –  Potatoswatter Feb 6 '12 at 5:15

If T's constructor throws on the second construction, you got a problem. If you like brute-force approaches, check this:

T x(31, Blue, false);
x.~T();
const volatile bool _ = true;
for(;_;){
  try{
    ::new (&x) T(22, Brown, true);
    break; // finally!
  }catch(...){
    continue; // until it works, dammit!
  }
}

It even provides the strong exception guarantee!


On a more serious note, it's like stepping on a landmine, knowing it will go off if you move your foot...

And there actually is a way around the undefined behaviour of the double destruction here:

#include <cstdlib>

T x(31, Blue, false);
x.~T();
try{
  ::new (&x) T(22, Brown, true);
}catch(...){
  std::exit(1); // doesn't call destructors of automatic objects
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Hmm... and the landmine would be a class which throws on every but its first constructor call! –  Kerrek SB Jan 12 '12 at 3:01
1  
Why use _ at all? for(;;) is defined to be an infinite loop. –  GManNickG Jan 12 '12 at 3:22
7  
@GMan: That part was meant as more of a humorous answer, that's why the (;_;) emoticon. :) Also, a _ macro would be reserved for the implementation. :( –  Xeo Jan 12 '12 at 3:23
2  
@Xeo: I see, carry on. :) ☆☆☆ –  GManNickG Jan 12 '12 at 3:27
1  
@Xeo: I don't think _ is reserved for the implementation; it neither matches _[A-Z] nor __. Cf. the _1 placeholders from Boost and C++11 –  MSalters Jan 12 '12 at 9:25

If T's construction expression throws, you will double destruct the object, which is UB. Of course, even the desire to do this is indicative of a design failure.

share|improve this answer
    
Design failure, or moral failure? –  Crashworks Jan 12 '12 at 3:05
    
@Crashworks: Rather, self-esteem failure. You know, starting over and such... ;) –  Xeo Jan 12 '12 at 3:05
    
A question: It seems like a call to ~T() is special in that it will (obviously) call any code you've explicitly put in your destructor, and will also do a lot of automatic destruction of stuff? I had previously thought that the automatic stuff just happened around delete and and the end of the scope? Something new learned. –  Aaron McDaid Jan 12 '12 at 3:47
    
@Aaron delete invokes the destructor and then releases allocated memory. Calling ~T() explicitly only invokes the destructor (there is no allocated memory to release in the example). Doing this sidesteps normal automatic storage semantics, so the destructor will still be called anyway when control leaves the scope, even though you already called it manually. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 12 '12 at 3:54
    
I understand that. By 'automatic destruction of stuff' I meant calling the destructors of data members. A call to delete does three things, (1) execute the code you have written inside ~T(), (2) calls destructors on data members, and (3) frees the memory. I was surprised that, if you explicitly call ~T(), that you get (1) and (2). I had thought you would just get (1). –  Aaron McDaid Jan 12 '12 at 4:05

I tried to compile it, but I only dared to run it under debugger. So I took a look at disassembly my old compiler generated (comments are compiler's too):

@1 sub nerve.cells, fa0h
@2 xor x, x     // bitch.
@3 mov out, x
@4 test out, out
@5 jne @1
@6 xor x, x     // just in case.
@7 sub money, 2BC   // dammit.
@8 mov %x, new.one
@8 cmp new.one, %x 
@9 jne @7   
...
@25 jmp @1      // sigh... 
share|improve this answer

Mmm. Since you're doing everything that C++ discourages, I think everyone is forgetting about goto.

Note that after the explicit X.~T() call, and before it is reconstructed1, there would still be double destruction if someone did a goto to before the declaration/initialization of the variable x (even within the inner scope block).

Since you could obviously just document that, I won't go through the hassle of trying to 'fix' this. You could, conceptually, design a RAII class to manages object re-construction in-place, making this manoeuvre safe for goto's in any place. Note that you could have the placement-new constructor call get perfectly forwarded from the RAII manager object's destructor. Life is good.

The other caveats still apply, of course (see other answers)


1 we can assume nothrow constuction for this moment

share|improve this answer

There is nothing to stop you doing this, it will work in most cases. But as is the case in a lot of C++ knowing the specifics of your your cases will be the difference between it working as you want and a core dump. There are very few example of reasons I could see why you would want to do this in a real program, the only one that make sense is a memory mapped file.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.