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I know this has been done a thousand times before but I'm having trouble with getting this right. I need to format the value of a text input for dollar amounts. No commas should be allowed. Only two decimal places should be allowed. Examples of what should be allowed:

  • 100
  • 100.10
  • $100
  • $100.25

Below is my current incomplete regular expression. It currently allows multiple dollar signs to be included anywhere (not just at beginning), multiple decimal points to be included anywhere, and more than two decimal places which it shouldn't.

<head>
<script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.1/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" language="Javascript">
    $(function(){

        jQuery('.dollarAmountOnly').keyup(function () {
            this.value = this.value.replace(/[^$0-9\.]/g, '');
        });
    });
</script>
</head>
<body>
<input type="text" class="dollarAmountOnly"/>
</body>
</html>

I would greatly appreciate help. Thanks!

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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

EDIT

Sorry, your question clearly asked for exactly two decimal places. This is what you want:

var r = /^\$?[0-9]+(\.[0-9][0-9])?$/;

console.log(r.test("12.55"));  //true
console.log(r.test("$12.55"));  //true
console.log(r.test("$12"));     //true

console.log(r.test("$12."));    //false
console.log(r.test("$12.2"));    //false
console.log(r.test("$$12"));     //false
console.log(r.test("$12.555")); //false

You have to escape your dollar sign, then you want two option digits after the decimal point:

var r = /^\$?[0-9]+\.?[0-9]?[0-9]?$/;

console.log(r.test("12.55"));  //true
console.log(r.test("$12.55"));  //true
console.log(r.test("$12."));    //true
console.log(r.test("$12"));     //true

console.log(r.test("$$12"));     //false
console.log(r.test("$12.555")); //false

Fiddle

Or, to allow arbitrary digits after the decimal point, you could use a Kleene closure instead of two optional digits

var r = /^\$?[0-9]+\.?[0-9]*$/;

console.log(r.test("12.55"));  //true
console.log(r.test("$12.55"));  //true
console.log(r.test("$12."));    //true
console.log(r.test("$12"));     //true
console.log(r.test("$12.555")); //true

console.log(r.test("$$12"));     //false
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Thanks for the response. I tried your regex but it still allows multiple dollar signs. –  SquidScareMe Jan 12 '12 at 3:42
    
@SquidScareMe - are you sure? Two dollar signs fail for me –  Adam Rackis Jan 12 '12 at 3:45
    
@AdamRackis the asker also wants no $ required, but up to one allowed {0,1} would work yeah? –  Jordan Jan 12 '12 at 3:51
    
For some reason when I plug in your 1st regular expression all input is allowed. Not sure what is wrong. –  SquidScareMe Jan 12 '12 at 3:51
1  
@SquidScareMe - my pleasure :) –  Adam Rackis Jan 12 '12 at 4:12
show 4 more comments

For those of us that want to allow for a comma, here is the regex for that:

/^\$?\d+(,\d{3})*\.?[0-9]?[0-9]?$/

I advocate allowing it and removing the commas on the backend if you don't actually want them. Anything to make it easier for the user. Jakob Nielson discusses cumbersome forms at point #7.

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I'd recommend doing the validation not on .keyup (ie as the user types), but when the user submits the form.

Then instead of replacing invalid characters, you can just verify that the dollarAmountOnly textbox matches the right regex.

A regex for valid price is (this allows trailing/leading spaces):

/^ *\$?\d+(?:\.\d{2})? *$/g

So when the user presses submit, you see if the regex matches dollarAmountOnly, and if not then let the user know somehow.

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Thanks for the response. Unfortunately the requirement is to validate as the user types. –  SquidScareMe Jan 12 '12 at 3:43
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