Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to populate a circumference with points located at equal intervals. Here is the code (it uses some Processing, but it is not crucial for understanding):

class Circle (x: Float, y: Float, subdivisions: Int, radius: Float) extends WorldObject(x, y) {

  def subs = subdivisions
  def r = radius
  val d = r + r

  def makePoints() : List[Glyph] = { 
    val step = PConstants.TWO_PI / subdivisions
    val points = List.make(subdivisions, new Glyph())

    for(i <- 0 to subdivisions - 1) {
      points(i) position (PApplet.cos(step * i) * r + xPos, PApplet.sin(step * i) * r + yPos)
    }

    points
  }

  val points: List[Glyph] = makePoints()

  override def draw() {
    applet fill 0
    applet stroke 255
    applet ellipse(x, y, d, d)
    applet fill 255

    points map(_.update())
  }

}

class Glyph(x: Float, y: Float) extends WorldObject(x, y){
    def this() = this(0, 0)

    override def draw() {
      applet ellipse(xPos, yPos, 10, 10)
    }
}

object WorldObject {

}

abstract class WorldObject(var xPos: Float, var yPos: Float) {
  def this() = this(0, 0)
  def x = xPos
  def y = yPos

  def update() {
    draw()
  }

  def draw()

  def position(x: Float, y: Float) {
    xPos = x
    yPos = y
  }

  def move(dx: Float, dy: Float) {
    xPos += dx
    yPos += dy
  }
}

The strange result that I get is that all the points are located at a single place. I have experimented with println checks... the checks in the makePoints() method shows everything ok, but checks in the Circle.draw() or even right after the makePoints() show the result as I see it on the screen - all points are located in a single place, right where the last of them is generated, namely x=430.9017 y=204.89435 for a circle positioned at x=400 y=300 and subdivided to 5 points. So somehow they all get collected into the place where the last of them sits.

Why is there such a behavior? What am I doing wrong?


UPD: We have been able to locate the reason, see below:

Answering the question, user unknown changed the code to use the fill method instead of make. The main relevant difference between them is that make pre-computes it's arguments and fill does not. Thus make fills the list with totally identical items. However, fill repeats the computation on each addition. Here are the source codes of these methods from Scala sources:

  /** Create a list containing several copies of an element.
   *
   *  @param n    the length of the resulting list
   *  @param elem the element composing the resulting list
   *  @return     a list composed of n elements all equal to elem
   */
  @deprecated("use `fill' instead", "2.8.0")
  def make[A](n: Int, elem: A): List[A] = {
    val b = new ListBuffer[A]
    var i = 0
    while (i < n) {
      b += elem
      i += 1
    }
    b.toList
  }

And the fill method:

  /** Produces a $coll containing the results of some element computation a number of times.
   *  @param   n  the number of elements contained in the $coll.
   *  @param   elem the element computation
   *  @return  A $coll that contains the results of `n` evaluations of `elem`.
   */
  def fill[A](n: Int)(elem: => A): CC[A] = {
    val b = newBuilder[A]
    b.sizeHint(n)
    var i = 0
    while (i < n) {
      b += elem
      i += 1
    }
    b.result
  }
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I changed a lot of variables forth and back (def x = ... => def x () = , x/ this.x and x/xPos and so on) added println statements and removed (P)applet-stuff, which made the compiler complain.

Providing a compilable, runnable, standalone demo would be beneficial. Here it is:

class Circle (x: Float, y: Float, subdivisions: Int, radius: Float) 
    extends WorldObject (x, y) {

  def subs = subdivisions
  def r = radius
  val d = r + r

  def makePoints() : List[Glyph] = { 
//    val step = PConstants.TWO_PI / subdivisions
    val step = 6.283F / subdivisions
    val points = List.fill (subdivisions) (new Glyph ())
    for (i <- 0 to subdivisions - 1) {
//      points (i) position (PApplet.cos (step * i) * r + xPos, 
//          PApplet.sin (step * i) * r + yPos)
                val xx = (math.cos (step * i) * r).toFloat + xPos
                val yy = (math.sin (step * i) * r).toFloat + yPos
                println (xx + ": " + yy)
      points (i) position (xx, yy)
    }
    points
  }

  val points: List [Glyph] = makePoints ()
  override def draw () {
  /*
    applet fill 0
    applet stroke 255
    applet ellipse(x, y, d, d)
    applet fill 255
  */
//    println ("Circle:draw () upd-> " + super.x () + "\t" + y () + "\t" + d); 
    points map (_.update ())
    println ("Circle:draw () <-upd " + x + "\t" + y + "\t" + d); 
  }
}

class Glyph (x: Float, y: Float) extends WorldObject (x, y) {
    def this () = this (0, 0)
    override def draw() {
      // applet ellipse (xPos, yPos, 10, 10)
      println ("Glyph:draw (): " + xPos + "\t" + yPos + "\t" + 10); 
    }
}

object Circle {
    def main (as: Array [String]) : Unit = {
        val c = new Circle (400, 300, 5, 100)
        c.draw ()       
    }
}

object WorldObject {

}

abstract class WorldObject (var xPos: Float, var yPos: Float) {

  def this () = this (0, 0)
  def x = xPos
  def y = yPos

  def update () {
    draw ()
  }

  def draw ()

  def position (x: Float, y: Float) {
    xPos = x
    yPos = y
    // println (x + " ?= " + xPos + " ?= " + (this.x ()))
  }

  def move (dx: Float, dy: Float) {
    xPos += dx
    yPos += dy
  }
}

My result is:

500.0: 300.0
430.9052: 395.1045
319.10266: 358.78452
319.09177: 241.23045
430.8876: 204.88977
Glyph:draw (): 500.0    300.0   10
Glyph:draw (): 430.9052 395.1045    10
Glyph:draw (): 319.10266    358.78452   10
Glyph:draw (): 319.09177    241.23045   10
Glyph:draw (): 430.8876 204.88977   10
Circle:draw () <-upd 400.0  300.0   200.0

Can you spot the difference?

You should create a copy of your code, and stepwise remove code, which isn't necessary to reproduce the error, checking, whether the error is still present. Then you should reach a much smaller problem, or find the error yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for pointing all this out! It is very logical, and usually I do so, but I think that it is the spirit of novelty in Scala for me, that I cannot see yet how to reduce the problem even more. Sorry for the PApplet inclusions, I did not think that someone will try to run the code.. As for the solution, in your code there is the change from the make method of the list to the fill method. Now I understand the difference between them. What is strange, I was unable to find any docs on the make method of the List or it's superclasses to the extent that I was able to reach. –  noncom Jan 13 '12 at 9:12
    
I guess fill is primarly a new/better name, introduced with a recent version, while 'make' was used before. It's deprecated in 2.9 so I had to replace it, to make the code compile, but it shouldn't be a differnce. But I don't find a difference, which explains the different results. Maybe partial compilation solved a circular dependency? –  user unknown Jan 13 '12 at 9:20
    
I am using Eclipse with Scala IDE for my work, and it allows ctrl-clicking on a method or variable to see it's declaration. Doing so I was able to locate the declarations of the both methods. They differ in their intent and composition. I have edited the original post and added the descriptions of both - see there. –  noncom Jan 14 '12 at 7:41
    
Ah! I didn't realize that it was really the solution for your problem. :) –  user unknown Jan 14 '12 at 8:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.