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I wrote an implementation for a priority queue I needed, and now I would like to test it. I decided on using moq, as I've already used rhino mocks at work and want to try something new/possibly easier.

The interface for my PriorityQueue is pretty straight-forward:

public interface IPriorityQueue<TKey, TValue>  where TKey : IComparable
{
    void Enqueue(TKey priority, TValue value);
    bool IsEmpty();
    TValue Peek();
    TValue Dequeue();
}

I went to write my first test, which tests the Enqueue method. Here's the implementation for it:

public void Enqueue(TKey priority, TValue value)
{
    if (priority == null) { throw new ArgumentNullException("priority"); }

    if (_queue.ContainsKey(priority))
    {
        // queue contains key, therefore just add value to existing key's list
        _queue[priority].Add(value);
    }

    // otherwise just add pair
    else
    {
        _queue.Add(priority, new List<TValue>() { value });
    }
}

The first unit test I wrote was to test if the key was null, it should throw an argument null exception.

[TestMethod]
public void EnqueueNullKey_ThrowsArgumentNullException()
{
    /* Arrange */
    var mock = new Mock<IPriorityQueue<string, IMessage>>();

    // string implements the IComparable interface, and is nullable.
    mock
        .Setup(x => x.Enqueue(null, It.IsAny<IMessage>()))
        .Throws<ArgumentNullException>();

    /* Assert */
    mock.VerifyAll();   
}

So I realize now, that my method Enqueue will never be called, because I am instantiating an instance of my interface, not the implementation. Then the question begs to be asked, if I'm supposed to test with using my interfaces (at-least that was the impression I got after watching Roy Osherove's TDD - Understanding Mock Objects video) how am I to test my implementation?

Am I misunderstanding the advice to test with interfaces?

In the video he created a class within the test he was writing, and used that to test. I don't see how that would help me test my implementation of PriorityQueue (specifically the Enqueue method).

Thanks stack overflow!

edit: Here's the following (ugly) working test that I've came up with. I'm extremely unhappy with it, it feels so primitive. Can anyone suggest a better way of doing this? From the responses below, it seems like the framework is completely unnecessary for this unit test.

However, here it is:

[TestMethod]
public void EnqueueNullKey_ThrowsArgumentNullException()
{
    /* Arrange */
    var pq = new PriorityQueue<string, IMessage>();

    try
    {
        pq.Enqueue(null, null);
    }
    catch(ArgumentNullException)
    {
        Assert.IsTrue(true);
        return;
    }

    // failure condition if we don't catch the exception
    Assert.IsTrue(false);   
}
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1  
The purpose of Moq is to help you test things you couldn't otherwise test. For example, lets say you have a piece of specialized hardware that you access via ICustomHardware. You would mock that interface, but nothing else. –  Jonathan Allen Jan 12 '12 at 6:03
1  
Roy's approach to TDD is a bit - well, opinionated. It is narrow and out-dated in my opinion and leads beginners to make mistakes and run into problems that have already been solved by other TDD practitioners. I very much appreciate Roy's work in the field. But I wouldn't emulate his approach without considering alternative POVs. Have a look at the works of Kent Beck and go from there. –  Dennis Traub Jan 12 '12 at 6:19
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are getting it wrong. You don't need a mock of IPriorityQueue when you are testing methods on one of its implementation. What you need is a mock of queue

The responsibilities of Enqueue method are

  1. throwing exception if priority is null
  2. doing something on if condition
  3. doing something on else condition

For #1 testing is quite easy and a stub implementation of queue will suffice, for #2 and #3 you will need a mock of queue. For #2 and #3 you should test if mock queue's Add methods is called with correct parameters

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1  
could you elaborate what you mean stub implementation? I thought stubs never caused a unit-test to fail. –  Short Jan 12 '12 at 6:00
1  
A stub is one on which you don't perform asserts. So, just creating a queue object and not setting up any methods will suffice for your purpose. The fundamental thing that you need to understand here is that you don't need to mock IPriorityQueue –  P.K Jan 12 '12 at 6:02
    
You will need to inject __queue instead of directly instantiating it in your class –  P.K Jan 12 '12 at 6:05
    
That I can do. Just for clarification, in RhinoMocks you created actual "stubs." There doesn't seem to be any "stubs" in moq, if I inject my moq, will that be equivalent to a 'stub implementation of queue' ?? –  Short Jan 12 '12 at 6:08
    
Not having any method setup (assuming they won't be called) will be a stub or you can try StubAll() method on the mock –  P.K Jan 12 '12 at 6:30
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I think there is some misunderstanding.

If your test object has dependencies, which are defined as interfaces, you would mock these in order to be able to test your unit.

In your case, you have no dependencies which you need to replace for testing. As you would like to test your implementation, there is no sense to mock it. IMHO it is not necessary to test an existing class of the BCL.

A test (Nunit) test could look like this (untested)

[TestMethod]
public void EnqueueNullKey_ThrowsArgumentNullException()
{
   var queue = new YourPriorityQueue<string, IMessage>();
   var message = new SomeFooMessage(); // or use a mock for this

   Assert.Throws(typeof(ArgumentNullException), () => queue.Enqueue(null, message);
}
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so just instantiate a new instance of the queue and test it directly? No .VerifyAll() should be used then? –  Short Jan 12 '12 at 5:57
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You could use the [ExceptionExpected] attribute instead.

[TestMethod]
[ExpectedException(ExpectedException = typeof(ArgumentNullException)]
public void EnqueueNullKey_ThrowsArgumentNullException()
{
    /* Arrange */
    var pq = new PriorityQueue<string, IMessage>();

    /* Act */
    pq.Enqueue(null, null);
}

The test will fail if the ArgumentNullException is not thrown.

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