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I am writing a program which sums the first ten digits of one-hundred 50 digit numbers which are in a text file. Easy enough, and I got the right answer, but I'm trying to understand some weird things that appear to be going on. When the first cout line is included as it appears below the program outputs:

8549904804355727945614717320-7-60-4-3-2-7-3-4-8-7-7-6-1-840-9-5-2-3-39622981389563771795892386478402037366780930326737553

When it is changed to the comment on the right of it, it outputs:

97414719961102146325906539660-4-7-2-4-4-3-4-8-2-8-3-8-2-870-8-5-2-3-39622981389563771795892386478402037366780930326737553

I'm having trouble understanding
1) how what I output could somehow affect the future values it output.
2) How the dashes get into the program.

Note: the output is the sum of all the strings in reverse.

char file[] = "nums.txt";
ifstream ss(file);
string iString;
string sarr[100];
int sum[100];

while(getline(ss, iString, '\n')) {
  sarr[i] = iString;
  i++;
}
ss.close();

cout << sarr[0] << endl << endl; //or cout<<(int)sarr[0][3]-48<<endl<<endl;
for(int i = 99; i >= 0; i--) {
  sum[i] = 0;
  for(int j = 0; j < 100; j++) {
    sum[i] += (int)sarr[j][i];
  }
  sum[i] -= 4800;//since 100 strings and '0' in ascii is 48 subtract 48*100
}

for(int i = 99; i > 0; i--) {
  sum[i-1] += sum[i] / 10;
  sum[i] = sum[i] % 10;
  cout << sum[i];
}
cout << sum[0] << endl << endl;
share|improve this question
    
Which cout line are you changing to be a comment? There are three of them. –  Articuno Jan 12 '12 at 6:10
1  
what are you trying to do with this sarr[0][3]- 48...some comments would make your program more readable –  Sumit Jain Jan 12 '12 at 6:15
    
There's a couple of endls between the first and second cout. Did you omit the first line of output or mash the two lines together? –  Marcelo Cantos Jan 12 '12 at 6:17
    
And, can you show a few example lines from the input file? –  Articuno Jan 12 '12 at 6:19
    
@Sancho The first line in the input file which is sarr[0] is: 37107287533902102798797998220837590246510135740250 The second line is: 46376937677490009712648124896970078050417018260538 Also I intended the two endl just to make it easier to read when it outputs so I have the extra line of whitespace. –  emschorsch Jan 12 '12 at 6:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You say the first line of your text file is 37107287533902102798797998220837590246510135740250, which is 50 characters long, but here

for(int i = 99; i >= 0; i--) {
  sum[i] = 0;
  for(int j = 0; j < 100; j++) {
    sum[i] += (int)sarr[j][i];
  }
  sum[i] -= 4800;//since 100 strings and '0' in ascii is 48 subtract 48*100
}

You are looping with i going from 99 to 0 and using i to index that string. Your indices are going out of bounds and causing undefined behaviour. This is the danger of using hardcoded values instead of using the data to determine the bounds of the loop.

When random things like this happen and you're doing a lot of work with arrays, the first thing you should look for is indexing out of bounds somewhere. That is probably the most frequent cause of UB.

share|improve this answer
    
wow incredible thank you. So now that I know its such a stupid bug should I delete this post or leave it up in the off-chance someone else will find it useful? –  emschorsch Jan 12 '12 at 6:46
2  
@emschorsch I would leave it up, it's a perfectly valid question. Besides, it may remind someone in the future to "check again" for going out of bounds. –  Seth Carnegie Jan 12 '12 at 6:52

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