Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

in Python glob ignores "Permission denied" errors. Unfortunately I need to know if there was a directory which I can't read.

I could use os.walk() and fnmatch, but maybe there is a better solution?

Example:

user@pc:~
===> python
>>> import glob
>>> glob.glob('/root/*')
[]

There are files in /root, but user@pc is not allowed to read this directory.

A single Exception would not be enough. For example glob.glob('/var/log/*/*.log'). I want to know which directories exist, but are unreadable.

share|improve this question
    
What kind permission do you think is being ignored (read, write, execute)? Do you just need to check if a given directory name exists? –  jcollado Jan 12 '12 at 9:18
    
I added an example to the question. –  guettli Jan 12 '12 at 9:35
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One way to get all the directories and files that cannot be read is indeed use os.walk to traverse recursively a directory tree and then, for every directory and file, check permissions using os.access:

import os

unreadable_dirs = []
unreadable_files = []

for dirpath, dirnames, filenames in os.walk('/var/log'):
  for dirname in dirnames:
    dirname = os.path.join(dirpath, dirname)
    if not os.access(dirname, os.R_OK):
      unreadable_dirs.append(dirname)
  for filename in filenames:
    filename = os.path.join(dirpath, filename)
    if not os.access(filename, os.R_OK):
      unreadable_dirs.append(filename)

print 'Unreadable directories:\n{0}'.format('\n'.join(unreadable_dirs))
print 'Unreadable files:\n{0}'.format('\n'.join(unreadable_files))

Note: You could write your own recursive function that traverses the directory structure, but you'll be basically duplication os.walk functionality, so I don't see the use case for glob.glob.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.