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In the Linux kernel source code I found this function:

static int __init clk_disable_unused(void) 
{
   // some code
}

Here I can not understand what does __init means.

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5  
Good question! +1 from me! –  Sangeeth Saravanaraj Jan 12 '12 at 8:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 26 down vote accepted

include/linux/init.h

/* These macros are used to mark some functions or 
 * initialized data (doesn't apply to uninitialized data)
 * as `initialization' functions. The kernel can take this
 * as hint that the function is used only during the initialization
 * phase and free up used memory resources after
 *
 * Usage:
 * For functions:
 * 
 * You should add __init immediately before the function name, like:
 *
 * static void __init initme(int x, int y)
 * {
 *    extern int z; z = x * y;
 * }
 *
 * If the function has a prototype somewhere, you can also add
 * __init between closing brace of the prototype and semicolon:
 *
 * extern int initialize_foobar_device(int, int, int) __init;
 *
 * For initialized data:
 * You should insert __initdata between the variable name and equal
 * sign followed by value, e.g.:
 *
 * static int init_variable __initdata = 0;
 * static const char linux_logo[] __initconst = { 0x32, 0x36, ... };
 *
 * Don't forget to initialize data not at file scope, i.e. within a function,
 * as gcc otherwise puts the data into the bss section and not into the init
 * section.
 * 
 * Also note, that this data cannot be "const".
 */

/* These are for everybody (although not all archs will actually
   discard it in modules) */
#define __init      __section(.init.text) __cold notrace
#define __initdata  __section(.init.data)
#define __initconst __section(.init.rodata)
#define __exitdata  __section(.exit.data)
#define __exit_call __used __section(.exitcall.exit)
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These are only macros to locate some parts of the linux code into special areas in the final executing binary. __init, for example (or better the __attribute__ ((__section__ (".init.text"))) this macro expands to) instructs the compiler to mark this function in a special way. At the end the linker collects all functions with this mark at the end (or begin) of the binary file.

When the kernel starts, this code runs only once (initialization). After it runs, the kernel can free this memory to reuse it and you will see the kernel message:

Freeing unused kernel memory: 108k freed

To use this feature, you need a special linker script file, that tells the linker where to locate all the marked functions.

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5  
Clever! So that is what "Freeing unused kernel memory: 108k freed" meant. :-) I have sort of wondered all these years. I assumed it was some kind of buffers or something, not code. –  Prof. Falken Jan 12 '12 at 9:09

__init is a macro defined in ./include/linux/init.h which expands to __attribute__ ((__section__(".init.text"))).

It instructs the compiler to mark this function in a special way. At the end the linker collects all functions with this mark at the end (or begin) of the binary file. When the kernel starts, this code runs only once (initialization). After it runs, the kernel can free this memory to reuse it and you will see the kernel

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This demonstrates a feature of kernel 2.2 and later. Notice the change in the definitions of the init and cleanup functions. The __init macro causes the init function to be discarded and its memory freed once the init function finishes for built-in drivers, but not loadable modules. If you think about when the init function is invoked, this makes perfect sense.

source:http://fixunix.com/embedded/5276-what-__init-linux-kernel-code.html

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Read comment (and docs at the same time) in linux/ini.h.

You should also know that gcc has some extensions made specially for linux kernel code and it looks like this macro uses one of them.

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