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I'm not able to understand the internal sorting that is taking place in PriorityQueue:

import java.util.*;

public class TryME {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        PriorityQueue<Integer> q = new PriorityQueue<Integer>();
        q.add(3);
        System.out.print(q);
        System.out.print("");
        q.add(1);
        System.out.print(q);
        System.out.print("");
        q.add(9);
        System.out.print(q);
        System.out.print("");
        q.add(6);
        System.out.print(q);
        System.out.print("");
        q.add(2);
        System.out.print(q);
        System.out.print("");
    }
}

Output:

[3][1, 3][1, 3, 9][1, 3, 9, 6][1, 2, 9, 6, 3]

On what basis is this sorting taking place?

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you can always check codes of JDK, you know ;) –  Xorty Jan 12 '12 at 9:30
    
In short, natural ordering of Integer. –  Jasper Feb 28 '12 at 15:04
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5 Answers

The javadoc says:

This class and its iterator implement all of the optional methods of the Collection and Iterator interfaces. The Iterator provided in method iterator() is not guaranteed to traverse the elements of the priority queue in any particular order. If you need ordered traversal, consider using Arrays.sort(pq.toArray()).

If you execute

while (!q.isEmpty()) {
    System.out.println(q.poll());
}

You'll see that the elements are indeed sorted correctly.

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i want to know , how this internal sorting takes place . while each element is getting added to the priority queue , some kind of sorting is taking place . –  Gangam Mekerira Jan 12 '12 at 9:53
1  
Then why don't you look at the source code? It's freely available, and comes with the JDK. –  JB Nizet Jan 12 '12 at 9:54
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A PriorityQueue maintains things in order of priority. The first element you pull out is the highest priority. The likelhood is that this is implemented underneath using a heap data structure which provides the data in an order but without the full sorting (this allows more efficient insertion and deletion than resorting the contents each time).

As a consumer, the internal order is not important to you for a priority queue. You should just grab elements from it and be satisfied that they are the highest priority. The internals aren't something you should concern yourself with (see the Java doc that JB Nizet pointed out).

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The priority queue is implemented as a heap, where all children for a specific node is of lower priority than it's parent, but not necessarily of it's siblings.

The elements are stored in the array (I suspect) as follows:

For each node, the children are stored in 2*pos and 2*pos+1. Thus, for [1, 2, 9, 6, 3]:

element 1 (value 1), children are 2 and 9.
element 2 (value 2), children are 6 and 3
element 3 (value 9), 4 (value 6) and 5 (value 3) have no children...

If you remove from the queue the parent node is replaced by one of the children with the highest priority, which again is replaced by one of its children, etc. (The operation is very optimal, only O(log n) running time) For example:

[1, 2, 9, 6, 3]
[2, 9, 6, 3]
[3, 9, 6]
[6, 9]
[6]

The list is very much sorted, it's only in a heap which is not that evident when printing it our as a list.

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I haven't done anything in Java for the past 7 years, but most probably the ordering is some kind of heap.

However, as noted in other replies, how Java orders the elements internally shouldn't matter to you, you just want the elements to come out in the right order (i.e. lower/higher priority first).

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Thank you , for your answers. This link : toves.org/books/data/ch08-pq/index.html Clearly explains how sorting is taking place . –  Gangam Mekerira Jan 12 '12 at 10:55
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Basically, it's not sorted. Priority queue implementations usually amortize the sorting cost - they do the minimum amount of effort needed to ensure that elements are retrieved in the right order. It's partially sorted each time an element is extracted just enough to choose the highest priority element. The queue is never fully sorted.

Instead of printing the whole queue, if you call poll() to extract the numbers, you'll get them back in the order you expect.

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I don't quite agree... it is very much sorted, it's only in a heap rather than a list. A heap maintains a very specific ordering which allows very fast ordering if the next element to be removed needs to be the next-in-order. –  Jaco Van Niekerk Jan 12 '12 at 9:39
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