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System.Timers.Timer timer = new System.Timers.Timer();

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    timer.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(timer_Elapsed);
    timer.Interval = 2000;

    timer.Enabled = true;
    timer.Start();
}

private void timer_Elapsed(object myobject, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    Say("Time hit" + DateTime.Now.ToString());
}

what am i missing?

EDIT:

Tried to add:

timer.AutoReset = true;

For those curious Say Method is:

private void Say(string s)
        {

            try
            {
                txtSay.AppendText(s + "\r\n");
            }
            catch
            {
            }
        }

The say method doesn't have a problem in there. Works with everything else.

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6  
Did you click button1? ;) –  Øyvind Bråthen Jan 12 '12 at 10:00
    
ooops... but seriously. of course i did –  Isaac Pounder Jan 12 '12 at 10:01
2  
What do you do in Say method? –  Jani Jan 12 '12 at 10:02
1  
Your Say method has a UI cross-threading problem. You should get an exception in that case, however... –  leppie Jan 12 '12 at 10:12
1  
The real solution is never to write empty catch blocks that hide errors from you. Saves you a lot of work in writing SO questions. –  Cody Gray Jan 12 '12 at 10:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think you didint mentioned that you getting cross thread exception.. try to change code like that:

Invoke(new Action(()=>Say("Time hit" + DateTime.Now.ToString())));
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YES!!! exactly. could you please point me to read up on why does this happen please!? –  Isaac Pounder Jan 12 '12 at 10:16
1  
@IsaacPounder: Read up on ISynchronizeInvoke interface. –  leppie Jan 12 '12 at 10:17
    
@IsaacPounder: Heh, if you remove the empty catch statement then cut and paste the exception message into your search engine of choice, you'll find exactly what you need... –  Ade Stringer Jan 12 '12 at 10:22
    
@leppie - thankyou –  Isaac Pounder Jan 12 '12 at 10:25
    
@Isaac System.Timers.Timer starts executing in new thread. Please read How to: Make Thread-Safe Calls to Windows Forms Controls –  Reniuz Jan 12 '12 at 10:26

Because

  1. your Timers.Timer does not set a SyncObject
  2. Therefore your event fires on another thread
  3. Setting the Text property raises a cross-threading Exception
  4. And then you swallow that exception without any trace

    private void Say(string s)
    {
        try
        {
            txtSay.AppendText(s + "\r\n");
        }
        catch  // empty catch-block: the real fundamental problem
        {
        }
    }
    

So the Timer event does fire but it produces an error that remains hidden.

The short, practical solution would be to use a Windows.Timer for a GUI related timer.

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yes, I actually had it working with the windows forms timer. however i was using this form to test, but where I actually need this thing - its not GUI (and there is no textbox there). you are also correct in the fact I wasn't catching that exception either. The solution for textbox example in your case works. i +1nd it –  Isaac Pounder Jan 12 '12 at 10:22
    
indeed the real problem –  V4Vendetta Jan 12 '12 at 10:39

This might not be right, but going by the MSDN example, you shouldn't need to call t.Start(), t.Enable should start it. Since you start it by doing t.Enabled and t.Start, there might be some conflict with the AutoRest property.

I would also make sure the Say method works like it should by adding a break point or something similar. I have no clue what you are calling AppendText on in this case.

A little bit of guess work.

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No, it doesn't matter –  Haris Hasan Jan 12 '12 at 10:09

You needn't set the EventHandler in the Click Method. Set it e.g. in the constructor of your class and it will work.

Leave the Start() Method in the click function:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    timer.Start();
}
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tried this. doesn't work. Reniuz & Leppie were correct. –  Isaac Pounder Jan 12 '12 at 10:21

As Reniuz says, you're likely to be getting an exception because you're trying to update the UI from a different thread. The Timer class runs on a separate thread to prevent it from interfering with the responsiveness of your application.

This is an excellent example of why try { /* something */ } catch {} is a bad idea - you've totally hidden the error from yourself by writing this. If you hadn't written that, you'd probably have been able to figure out that you need to invoke the UI update on the correct thread from the exception message.

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In C++/CLI (managed C++ using.NET - it is really closed to C#) you should set object to synchronize by this timer.

It could look like this: +-

timer->SynchronizingObject = txtSay;

in C# probably: with "." instead of "->"

See this artice

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