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I've read Romain Guy's post on the <merge /> tag, but I still don't understand how it's useful. Is it a sort-of replacement of the <Frame /> tag, or is it used like so:

<merge xmlns:android="....">
<LinearLayout ...>
    .
    .
    .
</LinearLayout>
</merge>

then <include /> the code in another file?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 138 down vote accepted

<merge/> is useful because it can get rid of unneeded ViewGroups, i.e. layouts that are simply used to wrap other views and serve no purpose themselves.

For example, if you were to <include/> a layout from another file without using merge, the two files might look something like this:

layout1.xml:

<FrameLayout>
   <include layout="@layout/layout2"/>
</FrameLayout>

layout2.xml:

<FrameLayout>
   <TextView />
</FrameLayout>

which is functionally equivalent to this single layout:

<FrameLayout>
   <FrameLayout>
      <TextView />
   </FrameLayout>
</FrameLayout>

That FrameLayout in layout2.xml may not be useful. <merge/> helps get rid of it. Here's what it looks like using merge (layout1.xml doesn't change):

layout2.xml:

<merge>
   <TextView />
</merge>

This is functionally equivalent to this layout:

<FrameLayout>
   <TextView />
</FrameLayout>

but since you are using <include/> you can reuse the layout elsewhere. It doesn't have to be used to replace only FrameLayouts - you can use it to replace any layout that isn't adding something useful to the way your view looks/behaves.

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1  
In this example you could just make layout2.xml contain just <TextView />, nothing else. –  Karu Sep 12 '13 at 3:37
4  
True, a simple TextView could be used instead in layout2, however that then would be a completely different thing and not useful as an example in the answer to this question. –  Dave Oct 3 '13 at 14:55
    
That really helped. thanks –  Ajith Memana Nov 22 '13 at 5:41
    
In conjunction with the <include> tag it is always useful to use <merge> tag. –  pandit Dec 10 '13 at 13:04
3  
@Karu: you're right, the merge tag isn't necessary in this example but that's only because there's one element in layout2. If layout2 had multiple elements, then it MUST have a root node to be valid XML and that's when the merge tag comes in handy. –  gmale Feb 22 at 16:37

The include tag

The <include> tag lets you to divide your layout into multiple files: it helps dealing with complex or overlong user interface.

Let's suppose you split your complex layout using two include files as follows:

top_level_activity.xml:

<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:id="@+id/layout1" 
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical" >

    <!-- First include file -->
    <include layout="@layout/include1.xml" />

    <!-- Second include file -->
    <include layout="@layout/include2.xml" />

</LinearLayout>

Then you need to write include1.xml and include2.xml.

Keep in mind that the xml from the include files is simply dumped in your top_level_activity layout at rendering time (pretty much like the #INCLUDE macro for C).

The include files are plain jane layout xml.

include1.xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<TextView xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:id="@+id/textView1"
    android:text="First include"
    android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceMedium"/>

... and include2.xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Button xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:id="@+id/button1"
    android:text="Button" />

See? Nothing fancy. Note that you still have to declare the android namespace with xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android.

So the rendered version of top_level_activity.xml is:

<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:id="@+id/layout1" 
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical" >

    <!-- First include file -->
    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/textView1"
        android:text="First include"
        android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceMedium"/>

    <!-- Second include file -->
    <Button
        android:id="@+id/button1"
        android:text="Button" />


</LinearLayout>

In your java code, all this is transparent: findViewById(R.id.textView1) in your activity class returns the correct widget ( even if that widget was declared in a xml file different from the activity layout).

And the cherry on top: the visual editor handles the thing swimmingly. The top level layout is rendered with the xml included.

The plot thickens

As an include file is a classic layout xml file, it means that it must have one top element. So in case your file needs to include more than one widget, you would have to use a layout.

Let's say that include1.xml has now two TextView: a layout has to be declared. Let's choose a LinearLayout.

include1.xml:

<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:id="@+id/layout2" 
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical" >

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/textView1"
        android:text="Second include"
        android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceMedium"/>

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/textView2"
        android:text="More text"
        android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceMedium"/>

</LinearLayout>

The top_level_activity.xml will be rendered as:

<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:id="@+id/layout1" 
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical" >

    <!-- First include file -->
    <LinearLayout 
        android:id="@+id/layout2" 
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="match_parent"
        android:orientation="vertical" >

       <TextView
            android:id="@+id/textView1"
            android:text="Second include"
            android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceMedium"/>

       <TextView
            android:id="@+id/textView2"
            android:text="More text"
            android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceMedium"/>

   </LinearLayout>

     <!-- Second include file -->
   <Button
        android:id="@+id/button1"
        android:text="Button" />

</LinearLayout>

But wait the two levels of LinearLayout are redundant!

Indeed, the two nested LinearLayout serve no purpose as the two TextView could be included under layout1for exactly the same rendering.

So what can we do?

Enter the merge tag

The <merge> tag is just a dummy tag that provides a top level element to deal with this kind of redundancy issues.

Now include1.xml becomes:

<merge xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/textView1"
        android:text="Second include"
        android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceMedium"/>

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/textView2"
        android:text="More text"
        android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceMedium"/>

</merge>

and now top_level_activity.xml is rendered as:

<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:id="@+id/layout1" 
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical" >

    <!-- First include file --> 
    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/textView1"
        android:text="Second include"
        android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceMedium"/>

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/textView2"
        android:text="More text"
        android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceMedium"/>

    <!-- Second include file -->
    <Button
        android:id="@+id/button1"
        android:text="Button" />

</LinearLayout>

You saved one hierarchy level, avoid one useless view: Romain Guy sleeps better already.

Aren't you happier now?

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1  
Excellent description. –  RichieHH Mar 16 at 0:26
    
+1 just for the 'Romain Guy sleeps better already' statement ha. –  Abhijit Mar 25 at 13:58
1  
Our sole role when developing an android app is not to trouble Romain's sleep :) Thanks for your +1! –  Name is carl Mar 25 at 14:29
1  
explains very clearly, should be chosen as the answer –  lalitm May 21 at 5:58

blazeroni already make's it pretty clear, I just want to add few points.

  • <merge> is used for optimizing layouts.It is used for reducing unnecessary nesting.
  • when a layout containing <merge> tag is added into another layout,the <merge> node is removed and its child view is added directly to the new parent.
  • <merge> tag is particularly useful with <include> which is used to insert the contents of other layout.
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