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Given the following python script:

# dedupe.py
import re

def dedupe_whitespace(s,spacechars='\t '):
    """Merge repeated whitespace characters.
    Example:
    >>> dedupe_whitespace(r"Green\t\tGround")  # doctest: +REPORT_NDIFF
    'Green\tGround'
    """
    for w in spacechars:
        s = re.sub(r"("+w+"+)", w, s)
    return s

The function works as intended within the python interpreter:

$ python
>>> import dedupe
>>> dedupe.dedupe_whitespace('Purple\t\tHaze')
'Purple\tHaze'
>>> print dedupe.dedupe_whitespace('Blue\t\tSky')
Blue    Sky

However, the doctest example fails because tab characters are converted to spaces before comparison to the result string:

>>> import doctest, dedupe
>>> doctest.testmod(dedupe)

gives

Failed example:
    dedupe_whitespace(r"Green           Ground")  #doctest: +REPORT_NDIFF
Differences (ndiff with -expected +actual):
    - 'Green  Ground'
    ?       -
    + 'Green Ground'

How can I encode tab characters in a doctest heredoc string so that a test result comparison is performed appropriately?

share|improve this question
up vote 11 down vote accepted

I've gotten this to work using literal string notation for the docstring:

def join_with_tab(iterable):
    r"""
    >>> join_with_tab(['1', '2'])
    '1\t2'
    """

    return '\t'.join(iterable)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    import doctest
    doctest.testmod()
share|improve this answer
    
Cool. Maybe it works because there's no tab character within the string literal that is part of a doctest statement. The tab in the literal string answer must be left alone. So composing my test string that contains tabs outside of the heredoc quotes and using your raw heredoc notation might work! – hobs Jan 13 '12 at 22:57
    
I like the str.join(iterable) trick! – hobs Jul 8 '12 at 1:20

It's the raw heredoc string notation (r""") that did the trick:

# filename: dedupe.py
import re,doctest
def dedupe_whitespace(s,spacechars='\t '):
    r"""Merge repeated whitespace characters.
    Example:
    >>> dedupe_whitespace('Black\t\tGround')  #doctest: +REPORT_NDIFF
    'Black\tGround'
    """
    for w in spacechars:
        s = re.sub(r"("+w+"+)", w, s)
    return s

if __name__ == "__main__":
    doctest.testmod()
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks dude, worked perfectly for me. – colgur Jul 7 '12 at 23:21

You must set the NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE. Or, alternatively, capture the output and compare it to the expected value:

def dedupe_whitespace(s,spacechars='\t '):
    """Merge repeated whitespace characters.
    Example:
    >>> output = dedupe_whitespace(r"Black\t\tGround")  #doctest: +REPORT_NDIFF
    >>> output == 'Black\tGround'
    True
    """

From the doctest documentation section How are Docstring Examples Recognized?:

All hard tab characters are expanded to spaces, using 8-column tab stops. Tabs in output generated by the tested code are not modified. Because any hard tabs in the sample output are expanded, this means that if the code output includes hard tabs, the only way the doctest can pass is if the NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE option or directive is in effect. Alternatively, the test can be rewritten to capture the output and compare it to an expected value as part of the test. This handling of tabs in the source was arrived at through trial and error, and has proven to be the least error prone way of handling them. It is possible to use a different algorithm for handling tabs by writing a custom DocTestParser class.

Edit: My mistake, I understood the docs the other way around. Tabs are being expanded to 8 spaces at both the string argument passed to dedupe_whitespace and the string literal being compared on the next line, so output contains:

"Black Ground"

and is being compared to:

"Black        Ground"

I can't find a way to overcome this limitation without writing your own DocTestParser or testing for deduplicated spaces instead of tabs.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, didn't think to do the capture and compare manually. That's exactly what I needed. I didn't want to use NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE (because I'm testing a script that modifies whitespace). – hobs Jan 12 '12 at 22:54
    
Just tried your doctest string and it failed. Tried nearly every combination of double-quoting, single quoting, and raw strings for input and output. ...in __main__.dedupe_whitespace Failed example: output == 'Black Ground' Expected: True Got: False – hobs Jan 12 '12 at 23:24
    
You're right, I'm editing the answer. – Chewie Jan 13 '12 at 10:49
    
Thanks for digging into the docs. I'd done the same and made the same mistake. As far as I can tell, using r""" prevents tab expansion, both in the test expression and the test result string literal. – hobs Jan 13 '12 at 23:20

TL;DR: Escape the backslash, i.e., use \\n or \\t instead of \n or \t in your otherwise unmodified strings;

You probably don't want to make your docstrings raw as then you won't be able to use any Python string escapes including those you might want to.

For a method that supports using normal escapes, just escape the backslash in the backslash-character escape so after Python interprets it, it leaves a literal backslash followed by the character which doctest can parse.

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This is basically YatharhROCK's answer, but a bit more explicit. You can use raw strings or double escaping. But why?

You need the string literal to contain valid Python code that, when interpreted, is the code you want to run/test. These both work:

#!/usr/bin/env python

def split_raw(val, sep='\n'):
  r"""Split a string on newlines (by default).

  >>> split_raw('alpha\nbeta\ngamma')
  ['alpha', 'beta', 'gamma']
  """
  return val.split(sep)


def split_esc(val, sep='\n'):
  """Split a string on newlines (by default).

  >>> split_esc('alpha\\nbeta\\ngamma')
  ['alpha', 'beta', 'gamma']
  """
  return val.split(sep)

import doctest
doctest.testmod()

The effect of using raw strings and the effect of double-escaping (escape the slash) both leaves in the string two characters, the slash and the n. This code is passed to the Python interpreter, which takes "slash then n" to mean "newline character" inside a string literal.

Use whichever you prefer.

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