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I am using JQuery and custom images for custom radio buttons. Right now, it would work as a checkbox. I need it to work as a radio.

When I click on either of both radio's both will get ticked instead of one at a time. Am I missing something?

HTML:

<label for="radio1">
    <img src="radio_unchecked.png" style="vertical-align:middle" />
    <input name="radiogroup" type="radio" id="radio1" style="display:none;">
</label>

<label for="radio2">
    <img src="radio_unchecked.png" style="vertical-align:middle" />
    <input name="radiogroup" type="radio" id="radio2" style="display:none;">
</label>

JavaScript:

$(document).ready(function() {

    $("#radio1").change(function() {
        if (this.checked) {
            $(this).prev().attr("src", "radio_checked.png");
        } else {
            $(this).prev().attr("src", "radio_unchecked.png");
        }
    });


    $("#radio2").change(function() {
        if (this.checked) {
            $(this).prev().attr("src", "radio_checked.png");
        } else {
            $(this).prev().attr("src", "radio_unchecked.png");
        }
    });

});
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You have no click handling for the images, I wonder how you can even test any function when the radio buttons are hidden via display:none;? The change event never fires, does it? \\edit: Oh, I see, the labels are triggering the radio buttons of course. –  Connum Jan 12 '12 at 12:43
1  
@Connum: The imgs are within the label for the radio button, so the click reaches the label, which is just like the click reaching the radio button. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 12 '12 at 12:48
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The radio buttons are working correctly (proof), but your logic for updating the images is incorrect. Both images have to change when either radio button is clicked, since both values change (and the change handler is only fired on the one that you clicked). Have a single change handler used by both radio buttons, and set both images on every change, e.g.:

$('#radio1, #radio2').change(function() {
  var r;

  r = $("#radio1");
  r.prev().attr("src", r[0].checked ? checkedImage : uncheckedImage);
  r = $("#radio2");
  r.prev().attr("src", r[0].checked ? checkedImage : uncheckedImage);

});

Live example


Side note: If your target browsers support the :checked pseudo-class (IE only has this as of IE9, not in IE8 or earlier) and adjacent sibling combinator from CSS3, you can do this entirely with CSS:

HTML:

<input type="radio" name="radiogroup" id="radio1" style="display: none">
<label for="radio1"></label>
<input type="radio" name="radiogroup" id="radio2" style="display: none">
<label for="radio2"></label>

CSS:

#radio1 + label, #radio2 + label {
    display: inline-block;
    background-image: url(radio_unchecked.png);
    width: 32px;  /* Whatever matches the images */
    height: 32px; /* Whatever matches the images */
}
#radio1:checked + label, #radio2:checked + label {
    background-image: url(radio_checked.png);
}

Live example

Or alternately (it's just the selectors that are different):

input[name="radiogroup"] + label {
    display: inline-block;
    background-image: url(radio_unchecked.png);
    width: 32px;  /* Whatever matches the images */
    height: 32px; /* Whatever matches the images */
}
input[name="radiogroup"]:checked + label {
    background-image: url(radio_checked.png);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for CSS solution. Nice! :) –  PPvG Jan 12 '12 at 13:10
1  
@PPvG: Thanks! Yeah, it works in just about all modern browsers, though sadly not in IE8, which means using it "in the wild" is still a little ways off. Hopefully soon, though! –  T.J. Crowder Jan 12 '12 at 14:07
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This should work:

<label for="radio1">
    <img src="radio_unchecked.png" style="vertical-align:middle" />
    <input name="radiogroup" type="radio" id="radio1" style="display:none;">
</label>

<label for="radio2">
    <img src="radio_unchecked.png" style="vertical-align:middle" />
    <input name="radiogroup" type="radio" id="radio2" style="display:none;">
</label>

<script>
 $(document).ready(function(){

     $("input[name=radiogroup]").change(function() {
        $("input[name=radiogroup]").prev().attr("src", "radio_unchecked.png");
        $(this).prev().attr("src", "radio_checked.png");
     });
 });

</script>
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The change event fires only for the radio button that was changed by the user, not for any other radio buttons that may be automatically unchecked in that process.

You should update all of the images when the change event for any radio button fires:

var radios = $('input:radio');

radios.change(function() {
    radios.filter(':checked').prev().attr("src", "radio_checked.png");
    radios.filter(':not(:checked)').prev().attr("src", "radio_unchecked.png");
});

This will work for any number of radio buttons. A reference to the original collection of radio inputs is kept in radios (this is more efficient). When any of the <label>s is clicked, the event handler fires. Inside the handler, filter() is used to separate the radios collection into checked and the unchecked radio inputs.

Working demo: http://jsbin.com/ibaqid/2/edit#javascript,live

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Try replacing:

this.checked

with this:

$(this).is(':checked')
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2  
No, the checked property of the raw DOM element for the input is completely reliable cross-browser. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 12 '12 at 12:37
    
Changed it to this: if $(this).is(':checked') { and it's stopped working ... also tried without the "if" without success –  Satch3000 Jan 12 '12 at 12:44
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