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I've got 2 different types of events that I want my class to be able to listen for and process accordingly (and differently).

I tried: public class ListenerClass implements ApplicationListener<Foo>, ApplicationListener<Bar>

This gives me an error that you can't implement the same interface twice with different arguments.

Short of implementing a listener for ApplicationEvent (or some other common interface that Foo and Bar would implement) and using instanceof to determine what path to take, do I have any other options?

Thanks!

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up vote 24 down vote accepted

See Spring 4.2 update at the end of this answer!

Spring < 4.2

Not really.

You can use a common super class for the argument (for example ApplicationEvent) or a common interface that Foo and Bar implements then you must fitler it by your self.

public class ListenerClass implements ApplicationListener<ApplicationEvent> {
    ...
    if(event instanceOf Foo || event instance of Bar) {
    }
}

The other approach would be using two Application Listeners

public class ListenerClass {

    void onFoo(Foo foo){}
    void onBar(Bar bar){}

    static class FooListener implements ApplicationListener<Foo> {
       ListenerClass listerner;
       ....
       public void onApplicationEvent(Foo foo) {
           listener.onFoo(foo);
       }
    }
    static class BarListener implements ApplicationListener<Bar> {
       ListenerClass listerner;
       ....
       public void onApplicationEvent(Bar bar) {
           listener.onBar(bar);
       }
    }
}

Important: all 3 instances must be spring beans!


Of course you can implement such functionality by your own. You have at least two different choices, make it based on the spring event dispatcher framework or do it completely separated. For the second choice defently have a look a the CDI-Event Mechanim, and may search for some spring ports.

I have implemented the first choice by my self some years (I guess in 2007/2008) ago. I have head a event dispatcher that listend to all events. It was configured though an XML file. This xml files contains "references"! to methods in beans for every event that should been dispatched - this methods would been invoked by reflection. So it was possible to have strong typed event handler methods (that was the aim of that approach) but also to have several handler methods in one class. Nowadays I would skip the xml file and would use Annotations and a Bean-Post-Processor


Spring 4.2 update

Spring 4.2 will have an improved event listener configuration (bases on annotations) that makes it possible to have two different event listener Methods in one bean.

@Component
public class ListenerClass {

  @EventListener
  public void handleFooEvent(Foo fooEvent) {...}

  @EventListener
  public void handleBarEvent(Bar barEvent) {...}

}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm doing something similar to your first suggestion right now, but it's a common type between Foo and Bar (rather than object). The second option is not a bad compromise I guess. It's still not ideal. I was really hoping that I was overlooking something. It seems like this must be a common issue. – Luke Jan 12 '12 at 18:01
    
Also, publishEvent takes an ApplicationEvent so you couldn't have an Object event being sent, it would have to be something that implements ApplicationEvent at least. Might want to change that to make your first example more clear. – Luke Jan 12 '12 at 18:50
    
ApplicationEvent vs Object you are right, anyway it is the same princip. -- I corrected it – Ralph Jan 12 '12 at 20:52
    
All 3 instances must be spring beans. It means if you use annotations that you should add @Component for each inner static class. – Rudy Vissers Dec 9 '15 at 13:40

Spring < 4.2

A little more elegant than instanceof or static class is the visitor pattern. I think the visitor pattern provides a very useful alternative to that shortcoming of older Spring.

public class ListenerClass implements ApplicationListener<FooBarBase>, FooBarVisitor {
    @Override
    public void onApplicationEvent(FooBarBase fooBarBase) {
        fooBarBase.accept(this);
    }

    @Override
    public void visitFoo(Foo foo) {
        System.out.println("Handling Foo Event...");
    }

    @Override
    public void visitBar(Bar bar) {
        System.out.println("Handling Bar Event...");
    }
}

public interface FooBarVisitor {
    void visitFoo(Foo foo);
    void visitBar(Bar bar);
}

public abstract class FooBarBase extends ApplicationEvent {
    public FooBarBase(Object source) {
        super(source);
    }

    abstract void accept(FooBarVisitor visitor);
}

public class Bar extends FooBarBase {
    public Bar(Object source) {
        super(source);
    }

    @Override
    void accept(FooBarVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visitBar(this);
    }
}

public class Foo extends FooBarBase {
    public Foo(Object source) {
        super(source);
    }

    @Override
    void accept(FooBarVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visitFoo(this);
    }
}
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