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Here is my first try at a generic histogram template function in C++ tested with GCC 4.6. However, I would like to merge dense_histogram() and sparse_histogram() into one common generic function template. The problem is that the dense-specific constructor H h(n, 0) is neither defined nor relevant in the sparse version H h. Is there a way to solve this in some clever C++ regular way or statically typically using conditional compilation through Boost Type.Traits (#include <boost/type_traits.hpp>)?

#include <algorithm>
#include <limits>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <unordered_map>

namespace std
{

/*!
 * \em Dense Histogram of \p a.
 *
 * \tparam V is Value Type.
 * \tparam C is Count (Bin) Type.
 * \tparam H is Histogram Storage Type, typically a vector.
 *
 * \param[in] x is a set of the input data set
 */
template <class V, class C = size_t, class H = vector<C> >
inline
H dense_histogram(const V & x)
{
    typedef typename V::value_type E; // element type
    size_t n = (static_cast<C>(1)) << (8*sizeof(E)); // maximum number of possible elements for dense variant
    H h(n, 0);                       // histogram
    C bmax = 0;                      // bin max
    for_each(begin(x), end(x),  // C++11
             [&h, &bmax] (const E & e) { // value element
                 h[e]++;
                 bmax = std::max(bmax, h[e]);
             });
    return h;
}
template <class V, class H = vector<size_t> > H make_dense_histogram(const V & x) { return dense_histogram<V, size_t, H>(x); }

/*!
 * \em Sparse Histogram of \p a.
 *
 * \tparam V is Value Type.
 * \tparam C is Count (Bin) Type.
 * \tparam H is Histogram Structure Type, typically a unordered_map.
 *
 * \param[in] x is a set of the input data set
 */
template <class V, class C = size_t, class H = unordered_map<typename V::value_type, C> >
inline
H sparse_histogram(const V & x)
{
    typedef typename V::value_type E; // element type
    H h;                        // histogram
    C bmax = 0;                 // bin max
    for_each(begin(x), end(x), // C++11
             [&h,&bmax] (const E & e) { // value element
                 h[e]++;
                 bmax = std::max(bmax, h[e]);
             });
    return h;
}
template <class V, class H = unordered_map<typename V::value_type, size_t> > H make_sparse_histogram(const V & x) { return sparse_histogram<V, size_t, H>(x); }

}

run using

share|improve this question
1  
I'd leave it as-is. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 12 '12 at 14:14
1  
Couldn't you implement sparse map in terms of dense map? All you are doing is switching the default template parameter for the container. I would just have one create_histogram function, templated on the container. –  Lalaland Jan 12 '12 at 14:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you should simply put only the common parts in a third function leaving dense_histogram and sparse_histogram to create h and call that implementation function:

template <class V, class C = size_t, class H>
inline void histogram_impl(const V & x, H& h) {
    typedef typename V::value_type E; // element type
    C bmax = 0;                      // bin max
    for_each(begin(x), end(x),  // C++11
             [&h, &bmax] (const E & e) { // value element
                 h[e]++;
                 bmax = std::max(bmax, h[e]);
             });
    return h;
}
template <class V, class C = size_t, class H = vector<C> >
inline H dense_histogram(const V & x) {
    typedef typename V::value_type E; // element type
    size_t n = (static_cast<C>(1)) << (8*sizeof(E)); // maximum number of possible elements for dense variant
    H h(n, 0);                       // histogram
    histogram_impl(x, h);
    return h;
}
template <class V, class C = size_t, class H = unordered_map<typename V::value_type, C> >
inline H sparse_histogram(const V & x) {
    H h;                        // histogram
    histogram_impl(x, h);
    return h;
}

However since you asked for it: As you are working on containers I would assume they have a cheap move, so you could define a creation trait to generate your container and move that into your local variable. Then you can write your own detection of an appropriate constructor like this:

template<typename T> struct has_explicit_length_constructor{
private:
   template<typename U>
   decltype(U(0, 0), void(), std::true_type()) test(int x);
   template<typename>
   std::false_type test(...);
  typedef decltype(test<T>(0)) constant_type;
public:
   constexpr bool value = constant_type::value;
};

template<class H, bool B = has_explicit_length_constructor<H>::value> struct histogram_creation_trait;
template<class H> struct histogram_creation_trait<H, true> {
  static H create()  {
    size_t n = (static_cast<C>(1)) << (8*sizeof(typename V::value_type));
    return H(n, 0);  
  }
};
template<class H> struct histogram_creation_trait<H, false>
{ static H create()  { return H(); } };

template <class V, class C = size_t, class Ht>
inline void histogram_impl(const V & x, H& h, Trait) {
    typedef typename V::value_type E; // element type
    C bmax = 0;                      // bin max
    H h = histogram_creation_trait<H>::create();
    for_each(begin(x), end(x),  // C++11
             [&h, &bmax] (const E & e) { // value element
                 h[e]++;
                 bmax = std::max(bmax, h[e]);
             });
    return h;
}
template <class V, class H = vector<size_t> > H make_dense_histogram(const V & x) { return histogram_impl<V, size_t, H>(x); }
template <class V, class H = unordered_map<typename V::value_type, size_t> > H make_sparse_histogram(const V & x) { return histogram_impl<V, size_t, H>(x); }

As a side not: Adding your own methods to std is UB by the standard ([namespace.std] $17.6.4.2.1 p1):

The behavior of a C++ program is undefined if it adds declarations or definitions to namespace std or to a namespace within namespace std unless otherwise specified. A program may add a template specialization for any standard library template to namespace std only if the declaration depends on a user-defined type and the specialization meets the standard library requirements for the original template and is not explicitly prohibited.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I'll change the namespace. –  Nordlöw Jan 12 '12 at 17:48

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