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I know it is a Macro we are passing to a function. How do you explain what is the use of this macro, and in which scenario i have to use this ?.

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Whereas applications developed conforming to POSIX.1 - (IEEE 1003.1-2008, ISO/IEC 9945:2009) and / or Single Unix Specification 2008 (ISO/IEC 9945:2009 with X/Open Curses) help ensure how portable your application is. The _GNU_SOURCE will most likely limits source code usage to GNU/Linux and GNU/Hurd systems, unless additional work is done to address the non-portability of such functionality on other platforms.

Some companies, and government / military contracts may require certain platform standards to be used.

If you are developing an Open Source / Free Software application that you wish to be available on multiple Unix and Unix-like systems (including Microsoft Windows NT, 2000, and newer which have a POSIX compatibility available) then limiting your development to POSIX.1 library functions makes this an easier task. Other targets include the free/open BSD platforms NetBSD, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, DragonflyBSD, as well as the commercial Unix systems (Solaris, AIX, HP/UX, etc.) that do not include _GNU_SOURCE functionality.

If you use an altered functionality of a portable function, I can't think of an example but I believe they do exist, it may create subtle bugs in non-GNU platforms.

So in general, if your development is already locked into GNU / Linux and GNU / Hurd then feel free to use such extensions, but avoid such usages for any applications that may be deployed on other Unix and Unix-like operating systems.

I do work on a large-ish code base that has been ported from two other Unix platforms to Linux, and we do use _GNU_SOURCE extensions sparingly, though most of the development is limited to modern POSIX or IEEE 1003.1 / Single Unix Spec and C99 (Standard C Library) standards for future compatibility.

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Thanks for the reply. Between, i tried the following code: #include <stdio.h> int main ( int argc, char ** argv) { char *p; asprintf (&p, "%s", "Welcome"); printf ("String is %s ", p); } gcc -o mysample mysample.c : i m able to compile and execute the code. I have included nowhere _GNU_SOURCE in the soure code, not i used macro while compiling. But still how it is compiling ? –  Whoami Jan 21 '12 at 4:30
    
The GCC documentation, on C Dialect Options lists that 'gnu89' / 'gnu90' is default (in version 4.6.2 and many other versions as well). gcc -v to check your version, and cpp -dM </dev/null to look for predefined headers. _GNU_SOURCE is not defined, so as the gcc manual explains extensions that don't conflict with ANSI/ISO standards are allowed by default. _GNU_SOURCE would also allow GNU extensions that modify or conflict with ANSI/ISO standards. –  mctylr Jan 25 '12 at 22:09

_GNU_SOURCE enables GNU extensions to the C and OS standards supported by the GNU C library, such as asprintf. Define it when you're using such non-standard functions and macros.

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What is disadvantage of using such non-standard ?. It is not portable across platform? –  Whoami Jan 12 '12 at 14:36
    
@Whoami: non-portability, indeed. The manpages for the C library document which standards functionality adheres to. –  larsmans Jan 12 '12 at 14:36
    
Thanks for the reply. Between, i tried the following code: #include <stdio.h> int main ( int argc, char ** argv) { char *p; asprintf (&p, "%s", "Welcome"); printf ("String is %s ", p); } gcc -o mysample mysample.c : i m able to compile and execute the code. I have included nowhere _GNU_SOURCE in the soure code, nor i used macro while compiling. But still how it is compiling ? –  Whoami Jan 21 '12 at 4:35

From glibc manual:

Macro: _GNU_SOURCE

If you define this macro, everything is included: ISO C89, ISO C99, POSIX.1, POSIX.2, BSD, SVID, X/Open, LFS, and GNU extensions. In the cases where POSIX.1 conflicts with BSD, the POSIX definitions take precedence.

http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_node/Feature-Test-Macros.html

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Some functions not mandated by the standard are provided in libraries, but are only available when some feature test macro is defined. _GNU_SOURCE is one of the macros that makes such functions available.

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