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I came across the web (don't recall where) a note that says that MS c++ stl containers have a memory leak in their clear() API.

Therefore if you have a:

void main()
{ 
   std::vector<int> vVec;
   for(int i =0; i < 100; i++)
      vVec.push_back(i);

   vVec.clear();
}

Therefore the memory allocated on the heap for the vector is not really released...

The note said (as far as i recall) the following technique to make sure the memory is really released...

void main()
{ 
   std::vector<int> vVec;
   for(int i =0; i < 100; i++)
      vVec.push_back(i);

   vVec.clear();
   vector<int>(vVec).swap(vVec);
}

Do you have experience with such? is the above true? and if yes, what actually happening here?

(and last question, sorry, is this true for all other stl containers?) Thanks,

share|improve this question
    
You have a bug in your code, you probably wanted to say vector<int>().swap(vVec) which creates an empty temporary, swaps its buffer with the given vector and then releases it, leaving vVec without its buffer. But you probably don't need to do this, clear()'s behaviour is an optimisation not a bug (see @awoodland's answer). – Kos Jan 12 '12 at 14:44
    
@Kos: thanks, again, this is not my code, but a code snippet i've noticed somewhere on the web. so you say the vector<int>(vVec) is not needed? – NirMH Jan 12 '12 at 19:52
    
I'd say it's incorrect since it invokes the copy constuctor on the temporary and then swaps the copy with the original- looks like nonsense to me. – Kos Jan 13 '12 at 11:37
up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's not a memory leak; it's the required behavior (by the standard). std::vector<>::clear() is not allowed to lower the capacity, and thus cannot free its buffer. The memory will be freed when the destructor is called, and in swap, the buffers will be swapped, so in

vector<int>().swap(vVec);

, the temporary object gives vVec its (empty) buffer, and receives the non-empty buffer of vVec, which it deletes at the end of the full expression.

This is normally not needed, or even wanted, after clear; if you want a completely new vector, just declare one. On the other hand, if you've been filling a vector gradually, it could easily have a capacity of more than is needed, and an excessively large buffer. In this case:

vector<int>(vVec).swap(vVec);

will first make a (temporary) copy with an exactly sized buffer, then swap buffers with vVec. The results will be that vVec has a capacity equal to its size, and no more. (Formally, this isn't guaranteed by the standard anywhere, but in practice, it corresponds to all of the implementations I know of.)

share|improve this answer
    
I deleted my answer in favour of this one since it said the key points far more succinctly than I'd managed. – Flexo Jan 12 '12 at 14:49
    
C++11 also has shrink_to_fit, which reduces a vector's capacity to match its size unless the implementation thinks it isn't worth bothering. It can also avoid copying the contents of the vector, by moving them instead. This makes no difference for int, but might for other value types. – Steve Jessop Jan 12 '12 at 15:09
    
@SteveJessop How can shrink_to_fit avoid moving them, if it actually does change the capacity? The default allocator is (was?) required to use ::operator new, and there's no provision for changing the size of an allocated block (and freeing only part of it) in the new/delete interface. – James Kanze Jan 12 '12 at 15:17
    
@James: it doesn't avoid moving them, but it can avoid copying them. vector<int>(vVec).swap(vVec); can't avoid copying them (at least, not if the copy constructor has observable effects). – Steve Jessop Jan 12 '12 at 16:09

std::vector<> is allowed to allocate more memory than is required (this is necessary to make it possible to append elements in amortized constant time).

clear() is not obliged (in fact, not allowed) to release the memory that's been allocated for the elements.

However, I would not call the above behaviours memory leaks since the memory will get correctly released when the vector goes out of scope.

share|improve this answer
    
s/obliged/allowed/ in the second paragraph. clear() is not allowed to reduce the capacity(), so in practice, it cannot release the memory. – James Kanze Jan 12 '12 at 14:46

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