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I've got a <div>, that's a certain height and width, and overflow:hidden so that specfic inner images are clipped; however I want one image in the <div> to pop out of the border (ie to override the overflow:hidden), how do I do this?

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2  
The fact that this cannot be achieved is, I think, a shortcoming of current HTML rendering capability. –  Lisa Jul 25 '12 at 1:54
    
Almost identical question: stackoverflow.com/questions/8432883/… –  Lisa Jul 25 '12 at 2:04
    
@Lisa I agree, I wish there was a way to exclude an element from any overflow! –  webkit Nov 2 '14 at 8:25
    
and now I am truly stuck, because I can't use absolute positioning and overflow is clipping my form! –  Samia Ruponti Dec 5 '14 at 20:24

9 Answers 9

up vote 14 down vote accepted

After some experimentation with overflow, z-index and positioning, I've come to the conclusion that overflow:hidden can't be overriden by a child element.

You'll probably need to have the image placed outside the div and use absolute positioning to place it on top of your overflow:hidden div.

here's a fiddle demonstrating: http://jsfiddle.net/gq8qq/

for posterity:

<body>
    <div>
        <div class="underDiv">
            <p>blah blah<br/>blah blah<br/>blah blah<br/>blah blah<br/>blah blah<br/></p>
        </div>
        <div class="overflowDiv"><p>blah</p></div>
    </div>
</body>

.underDiv{
  overflow:hidden;
  width:50px;
  height:150px;
  background-color:#FF00FF;
  position:relative;
  z-index:1;
}

.overflowDiv{
  z-index:4;
  position:absolute;
  left:25px;
  top:25px;
  height:50px;
  width:50px;
  background-color:#00FF00;
}
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I know this is an old post, but this can be done...at least in Chrome. I figured this out about two years ago and it's saved me a couple times.

Set the child to have position of fixed and use margins instead of top and left to position it.

#wrapper{
    width:5px;
    height:5px;
    border:1px solid #000;
    overflow:hidden;
}

#parent{
    position:relative;
}

button{
    position:fixed;
    margin:10px 0px 0px 30px;
}

Here is an example: http://jsfiddle.net/senica/Cupmb/

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Hey this seems to work great in Chrome, Firefox and Safari - I'll try it out in IE. Thanks for the hack. –  Iain Collins Oct 29 '13 at 22:00
    
Unfortunately this does not work in IE (version 10). It would have been really neat. –  Ingo Kegel Nov 13 '13 at 10:33
    
nice, but if you set position:fixed, it will be fixed - the button will stay on the same place while scrolling the page... –  betatester07 Feb 26 at 22:14
    
nice! works in IE 11. –  parliament Apr 15 at 20:32

You cannot, unless you change your HTML layout and move that image out of the parent div. A little more context would help you find an acceptable solution.

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All given answers where not satisfying for me. They are all hackish in my opinion and difficult to implement in complex layouts.

So here is a simple solution:

Once a parent has a certain overflow, there is no way to let its children override this.

If a child needs to override the parent overflow, then a child can have a different overflow than the other children.

So define the overflow on each child instead of declaring it on the parent:

<div class="panel">
    <div class="outer">
        <div class="inner" style="background-color: red;">
            <div>
                title
            </div>

            <div>                     
                some content
            </div>
        </div>    
    </div>  
</div>

.outer {
    position: relative;
    overflow: hidden;
}    

.outer:hover {
    overflow: visible;
}  

.inner:hover {
    position: absolute;
}

Here is a fiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/ryojeg1b/1/

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overflow refers to the container not allowing oversized content to be displayed (when set to hidden). It's got nothing to do with inner elements that can have overflow:whatever, and still wont' be displayed.

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Z-index doesnt seem to work, but here I have a workaround which worked fine for me, as I needed overflow only to be "visible" when hovering a child element:

#parent {
   overflow: hidden;
}

#parent:hover {
   overflow: visible;
}
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You can overflow an element out of the dive by wrapping it in another div, then set your image as position:absolute; and offset it using margins.

<div class="no-overflow">
<div>
<img class="escape" src="wherever.jpg" />
</div>
</div>

.no-overflow{
overflow:hidden;
width: 500px
height: 100px
}

.escape{
position: absolute;
margin-bottom: -150px;
}

Example (tested in firefox + IE10) http://jsfiddle.net/Ps76J/

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The trick is to keep the overflow:hidden element with position:static and position the overriding element relative to a higher parent (rather than the overflow:hidden parent). Like so:

http://jsfiddle.net/kv0bLpw8/

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I know that this probably will not be the best solution, but in case you've built your site using body overflow:hidden and now want to change overflow to visible on specific pages you can use classes and jQuery to do that. For example:

if ($('body').hasClass('thispage')) {
             $('body').css("overflow","visible");
}
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