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I have an array of objects with several key value pairs, and I need to sort them based on 'updated_at':

[
    {
        "updated_at" : "2012-01-01T06:25:24Z",
        "foo" : "bar"
    },
    {
        "updated_at" : "2012-01-09T11:25:13Z",
        "foo" : "bar"
    },
    {
        "updated_at" : "2012-01-05T04:13:24Z",
        "foo" : "bar"
    }
]

What's the most efficient way to do so?

share|improve this question
    
custom function: stackoverflow.com/questions/777597/… – Rene Pot Jan 12 '12 at 15:21
    
@Topener That link looks like it is to a question about PHP – David Brainer-Banker Jan 12 '12 at 15:24
    
my mistake.. didn't read it correctly – Rene Pot Jan 12 '12 at 15:27
up vote 91 down vote accepted

You can use Array.sort.

Here's an (untested) example:

arr.sort(function(a, b){
    var keyA = new Date(a.updated_at),
        keyB = new Date(b.updated_at);
    // Compare the 2 dates
    if(keyA < keyB) return -1;
    if(keyA > keyB) return 1;
    return 0;
});
share|improve this answer
3  
Couldn't you use keyA - keyB (or possibly keyB - keyA)? The date objects have a valueOf() method. – soktinpk Jul 17 '14 at 18:44
    
@soktinpk: Yeah. That should work. – Rocket Hazmat Jul 17 '14 at 19:22
    
var keyA = new Date(a.updated_at), Note there is ',' it must be replaced by " ; ". Other wise it will throw one error – user2181397 Nov 25 '15 at 11:52
    
@user2181397: Someone edited the code and introduced that syntax error. I fixed the code. Thanks for pointing that out. – Rocket Hazmat Nov 25 '15 at 14:26

I already answered a really similar question here: Simple function to sort a JSON object using JavaScript

For that question I created this little function that might do what you want:

function sortByKey(array, key) {
    return array.sort(function(a, b) {
        var x = a[key]; var y = b[key];
        return ((x < y) ? -1 : ((x > y) ? 1 : 0));
    });
}
share|improve this answer
4  
You, sir, are the man. blogs.citypages.com/blotter/assets_c/2009/02/… – Dom Feb 1 '13 at 16:42
1  
How would you reverse this? – user1428660 Jun 16 '14 at 14:30
3  
To make it case-insensitive, you could add .toLowerCase() to x and y variables – Jacob van Lingen Jul 30 '14 at 14:23
    
To reverse sorting functions like these, just multiply the result by -1 :) – Svish Mar 2 '15 at 9:04

Here's a slightly modified version of @David Brainer-Bankers answer that sorts alphabetically by string, or numerically by number, and ensures that words beginning with Capital letters don't sort above words starting with a lower case letter (e.g "apple,Early" would be displayed in that order).

function sortByKey(array, key) {
    return array.sort(function(a, b) {
        var x = a[key];
        var y = b[key];

        if (typeof x == "string")
        {
            x = x.toLowerCase(); 
            y = y.toLowerCase();
        }

        return ((x < y) ? -1 : ((x > y) ? 1 : 0));
    });
}
share|improve this answer

Sorting by an ISO formatted date can be expensive, unless you limit the clients to the latest and best browsers, which can create the correct timestamp by Date-parsing the string.

If you are sure of your input, and you know it will always be yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss and GMT (Z) you can extract the digits from each member and compare them like integers

array.sort(function(a,b){
    return a.updated_at.replace(/\D+/g,'')-b.updated_at.replace(/\D+/g,'');
});

If the date could be formatted differently, you may need to add something for iso challenged folks:

Date.fromISO: function(s){
    var day, tz,
    rx=/^(\d{4}\-\d\d\-\d\d([tT ][\d:\.]*)?)([zZ]|([+\-])(\d\d):(\d\d))?$/,
    p= rx.exec(s) || [];
    if(p[1]){
        day= p[1].split(/\D/).map(function(itm){
            return parseInt(itm, 10) || 0;
        });
        day[1]-= 1;
        day= new Date(Date.UTC.apply(Date, day));
        if(!day.getDate()) return NaN;
        if(p[5]){
            tz= (parseInt(p[5], 10)*60);
            if(p[6]) tz+= parseInt(p[6], 10);
            if(p[4]== '+') tz*= -1;
            if(tz) day.setUTCMinutes(day.getUTCMinutes()+ tz);
        }
        return day;
    }
    return NaN;
}
if(!Array.prototype.map){
    Array.prototype.map= function(fun, scope){
        var T= this, L= T.length, A= Array(L), i= 0;
        if(typeof fun== 'function'){
            while(i< L){
                if(i in T){
                    A[i]= fun.call(scope, T[i], i, T);
                }
                ++i;
            }
            return A;
        }
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Couldn't you just use Date.parse? – Rocket Hazmat Jan 12 '12 at 16:52

You can create a closure and pass it that way here is my example working

$.get('https://data.seattle.gov/resource/3k2p-39jp.json?$limit=10&$where=within_circle(incident_location, 47.594972, -122.331518, 1609.34)', function(responce) {

var filter = 'event_clearance_group', //sort by key group name
data = responce; 

var compare = function (filter) {
    return function (a,b) {
        var a = a[filter],
            b = b[filter];

        if (a < b) {
            return -1;
        }else if (a > b) {
            return 1;
        } else {
            return 0;
        }
    };
};

filter = compare(filter); //set filter

console.log(data.sort(filter));

});

share|improve this answer

Use underscore js,

var arrObj = [
    {
        "updated_at" : "2012-01-01T06:25:24Z",
        "foo" : "bar"
    },
    {
        "updated_at" : "2012-01-09T11:25:13Z",
        "foo" : "bar"
    },
    {
        "updated_at" : "2012-01-05T04:13:24Z",
        "foo" : "bar"
    }
];

_.sortBy(arrObj,"updated_at");

refer http://underscorejs.org/#sortBy

share|improve this answer

protected by Pankaj Parkar Nov 12 '15 at 14:29

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