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#include <stdio.h>

#define QUOTE(str) #str
#define EXPAND_AND_QUOTE(str) QUOTE(str)
#define TEST one-of-a-linux

int main() {
  printf(EXPAND_AND_QUOTE(TEST)"\n");
}

I get:

one-of-a-1

rather than

one-of-a-linux

Note that "linux" becomes "1" - i.e. the digit one

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1  
It means linux is a macro evaluating to 1. –  fge Jan 12 '12 at 15:23
    
If you are using gcc you might want to try -std=c89 or -std=c99 to avoid this issue. –  Charles Bailey Jan 12 '12 at 15:29
    
@CharlesBailey: third party curiosity, why would that help? –  Dan Fego Jan 12 '12 at 15:30
1  
gcc predefines a lot of userspace macros like linux and unix unless you put it in a stricter standards-compliant mode. –  Charles Bailey Jan 12 '12 at 15:43
    
@CharlesBailey: -std=c99 was exactly the answer I was looking for. Thanks. –  user1145808 Jan 13 '12 at 6:28

4 Answers 4

There's obviously #define linux 1 somewhere (or -Dlinux=1).

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On my Linux box:

$ gcc -dM -E - < /dev/null | grep 'linux\|unix'
#define __unix__ 1
#define __linux 1
#define __unix 1
#define __linux__ 1
#define __gnu_linux__ 1
#define unix 1
#define linux 1
$

Note the value of unix being 1 on unix platforms has been used in an IOCCC entry. Winner of the "Best One Liner" in 1987.

http://www.ioccc.org/years.html#1987_korn

The code was:

    main() { printf(&unix["\021%six\012\0"],(unix)["have"]+"fun"-0x60);}
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#undef linux
#define TEST one-of-a-linux
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One may not want to do that in a general case, in case any other system headers (that might use linux) are included after that. –  Dan Fego Jan 12 '12 at 15:29
    
undef linux can be followed by #define linux linux –  ugoren Jan 12 '12 at 15:44
    
@DanFego: Not if it's followed by main like in the example given. Generally you wouldn't do this in a header anyway... –  Matt Joiner Jan 12 '12 at 16:03
    
@ugoren: Yes it can. Don't do that. –  Matt Joiner Jan 12 '12 at 16:04
    
@matt, I think it should have been #define linux linux in the first place. It lets you ask #ifdef linux, but does nothing more. But changing what the compiler defined, even if you improve it, is indeed not something you want to do. –  ugoren Jan 12 '12 at 18:04

You have a #define for linux to 1 somewhere in your code. The following works fine!

#include <stdio.h>

#undef linux

#define QUOTE(str) #str
#define EXPAND_AND_QUOTE(str) QUOTE(str)
#define TEST one-of-a-linux

int main(void) 
{
    printf(EXPAND_AND_QUOTE(TEST)"\n");
    return 0;
}

Output:

/*
$ gcc mm.c 
$ ./a.out 
one-of-a-linux
$ 
*/

Note:

#define TEST 1linux
#define TEST linux1

prints the expected answers appropriately!

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