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I thought that this is easy, but my brain is melting right now..

The problem

Given the following IObservable<int> Stream: 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1

I want to split it into an IObservable<IEnumerable<int>> Stream of the form

1

1 0 0 0

1 0 0

1 0

1

so whenever there is a 0, it just gets added to the IEnumerable, and when a 1 occurs, a new List is started; This is a bit cleaner definition to what my real problem is.

My approach so far

I thought a good solution would be to first convert it into an IObservable<IObservable<int>>via the Window method and then use ToEnumerable, but somehow I don't get it to work.. I used Zip and Skip(1) to get a diff to last element, I used DistinctUntilChanged(), too. I spare you all the variantes I tried...

Probably the closest I came was this code:

int[] ints = new[] { 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1 };
var observable = Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1000)).Take(11).Select(i => ints[i]);

Subject<int> subject = new Subject<int>();
observable.Subscribe(subject);

var observableDiff = subject.Skip(1).Zip(subject, (n, p) => new { Previous = p, Next = n });
var windows = observable.Window(() => observableDiff.Where(x => x.Next == 1));

int index = 0;
windows.Subscribe(window =>
{
  Console.WriteLine(string.Format("new window [{0}] ", index++));
  window.Subscribe(number => Console.WriteLine(number));
});

That returns good results, but unfortunately it crashes at the end..

new window [0]
1
new window [1]
1
0
0
0
new window [2]
1
0
0
new window [3]
1
0
new window [4]
new window [5]
new window [6]
new window [7]
new window [8]
new window [9]
<-- it goes on here until window ~ [80] with a stackoverflow exception

If that bug in my code wouldn't exist, I would have achieved it...

Any help would be much appreciated. :)

Edit: I use Rx-Experimental, but it doesn't make a difference (checked with LinqPad). Also removed the Subject, it didn't influence anything. It seems with my new approach (Edit2), you need a subject, otherwise the start of the windows is totally weird.

Edit2: changed the problem slightly, to better highlight my problem, sorry. Also updated my solution.

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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This worked for me:

var ints = (new[] { 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1 }).ToObservable();

var result =
    ints
        .Publish(ns =>
            ns
                .Where(n => n == 1)
                .Select(n =>
                    ns.TakeWhile(m => m == 0).StartWith(n).ToArray())
        ).Merge();

I've used Publish in to make sure that the ints observable is treated as "hot" rather than "cold".

My results look like this:

Grouped ints

share|improve this answer
    
That looks very nice. Wow. Most elegant I've seen so far. But there is some lack in understanding on my side: if I already have a hot observable (see my "observable" variable), I wouldn't need publish. At least I thought that reading your answer. But if I replace your ints with my observable, and remove your publish, it swallows the zeros. Care to explain why? –  hko Jan 13 '12 at 11:05
    
@hko - Are you sure your observable is hot? –  Enigmativity Jan 13 '12 at 14:16
    
erm.. thanks :/ my original problem used a hot observable, but for my tests I didn't recognize that Observable.Interval is still a cold observable.. Narf, I'm still a Rx newbie. If I answer my question to add additional possibilities, will my marking of your answer as "the" right answer be removed? –  hko Jan 13 '12 at 17:01
    
@hko - If you have follow on questions then it is better to ask them as a new question, but if you edit this question it won't change marking my answer as correct. Cheers. –  Enigmativity Jan 13 '12 at 22:01
    
I meant "additional answers", as there are several other (good) answers I got over in the MSDN forums –  hko Jan 16 '12 at 7:58
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The built-in Buffer seems pretty close to what you need. An intermediate subscription between the source and the Buffer call will let you get the closings observables you need for Buffer.

IObservable<IList<T>> Buffer<T>(IObservable<T> source, 
                                Func<T, bool> startNew)
{
    return Observable.Create<IList<T>>(
        obs =>
        {
            var starts = new Subject<Unit>();
            return source.Do(v => 
                             {
                                if (startNew(v))
                                    starts.OnNext(Unit.Default);
                             })
                         .Buffer(() => starts)
                         .Where(v => v != null && v.Count > 0)
                         .Subscribe(obs);
        });
}
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nice, but a bit harder to read that the answer from Enigmativity –  hko Jan 13 '12 at 17:28
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Ok, these are good answers, too, from the Rx forums:

James Miles suggestion:

var source = new[] { 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1 }.ToObservable();

var windows = 
from window in source
  .Buffer(2,1) // create an overlapping buffer with 2 items
  .Publish(xs => xs.Window(() => xs.Where(x => x.Last() == 1))) // close the window if the 2nd item is == 1
from result in window
  .Select(buffer => buffer.First()) // we are only interested in the first item (the 2nd item might be the 1!)
  .ToArray() // aggregate the results of the window
where result.Any() // filter out final (empty) window
select result;

int index = 0;
windows.Subscribe(window =>
{
  Console.WriteLine(string.Format("new window [{0}] ", index++));
  foreach(var x in window)Console.WriteLine(x);
});

Dave Sexton suggested using the Parser class from Extensions for Reactive Extensions (Rxx), which seems to be a more semantic approach:

using Rxx.Parsers.Reactive.Linq;

public sealed class SplitLab : BaseConsoleLab
{
    protected override void Main()
    {

        var xs = Observable.Generate(
            new[] { 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1 }.GetEnumerator(),
            e => e.MoveNext(),
            e => e,
            e => (int) e.Current,
            e => TimeSpan.FromSeconds(.5));

        var query = xs.Parse(parser =>
            from next in parser
            let one = next.Where(value => value == 1)
            let other = next.Not(one)
            let window = from start in one
                        from remainder in other.NoneOrMore()
                        select remainder.StartWith(start)
            let windowAsString = window.Join()
            select windowAsString);

        using (query.Subscribe(TraceLine))
        {
            WaitForKey();
        }
    }
}

So many roads to rome..

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