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Recently, using C#, I just declared a method parameters using the Latin character ñ, and I tried to build (compile) my entire solution and it works, therefore I was able to execute my program. But I'm curious to know if it is wrong to use special characters such as Latin characters in a source code written in C#? If it is wrong, why?

Besides it is more legible and universal to write code in English, are there any other reason to not use special characters in a C# source code?

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I bet source code all over the world is full with comments written in the programmer's native language. So no, can't see how this can be wrong. –  Shadow Wizard Jan 12 '12 at 15:40
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But, besides comments, what about members name such as methods, arguments, etc... ? –  Rubens Mariuzzo Jan 12 '12 at 15:46
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You'll significantly reduce the odds that a large American company will ever buy yours and turn everybody into instant millionaires. Other than that, no, this is well supported by the IDE, C# compiler and the CLR. –  Hans Passant Jan 12 '12 at 15:47
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There's nothing "special" about that character. It's part of a language spoken by hundreds of millions of people! –  John Saunders Jan 12 '12 at 15:48
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If you use a obfuscator it would make no difference. –  Zuck Jan 12 '12 at 17:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Let me break this down into several questions.

Is it legal according to the specification to use non-Roman letters in C# identifiers, strings, and so on?

Yes, absolutely. Any character that the Unicode specification classifies as a letter is legal. See the specification for the exact details.

Are there any technical issues regarding non-Roman letters in C# programs?

Yes, there are a few. As you are probably aware, you can both "statically" and "dynamically" link code into an application, and the compiler is an application. We've had problems in the past where the compiler had a statically-linked-in old version of the Unicode classification algorithm, and the editor had a dyamically-linked-in current version, and now the editor and the compiler can disagree on what is a legal letter, which can cause user confusion. However, the accented Latin characters you mention have been in the Unicode standard so long that they are unlikely to cause any sort of problem.

Moreover, a lot of people still use old-fashioned editors; I learned how to program at WATCOM back in the late 1980's and I still frequently use WATCOM VI as my editor. I can sometimes code faster in it than I can in Visual Studio because my fingers are just really good at it after 23 years of practice. (Though these days I use Visual Studio for almost everything.) Obviously an editor written in the 1980's is going to have a problem with Unicode.

Are there any non-technical issues regarding non-Roman letters in C# programs?

Obviously, yes. I personally would rather use Greek letters for generic type parameters, for instance:

class List<τ> : IEnumerable<τ>

or when implementing mathematical code:

degrees = 180.0 * radians / π;

But I resist the urge in deference to my coworkers who do not particularly want to be cutting and pasting, or learning arcane key combinations, just to edit my code.

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I really like your idea of using Greek letters for generic type parameters and math related expressions. –  Rubens Mariuzzo Jan 12 '12 at 18:41
    
I suppose you meant "arcane" key combinations? –  phoog Jan 12 '12 at 20:22
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Out of curiosity, why don't you use a modern version of vi, like gvim? –  svick Jan 13 '12 at 9:20
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@CodeInChaos well a conforming program is in NFC, and Unicode ensures that a document using only assigned characters that is NFC in Unicode version X is NFC in version X+1 (the post composition version type of composition exclusions exist for this reason), so a conforming program would always be fine. Non-conforming but accepted previously is another matter. –  Jon Hanna Jan 20 '12 at 10:45
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@KeithThompson, I'm not sure how is that relevant, but it's quite close to that: <ctrl>Kp*. And I think you can configure it to be even easier. –  svick Jan 20 '12 at 18:13

Added this first bit based on the comment:

This doesn't answer the question... The OP isn't asking whether it is allowed (obviously it is), but whether it's wrong – Thomas Levesque

Ok, let me address it more directly:

it is wrong to use special characters such as Latin characters in a source code written in C#? If it is wrong, why?

By definition of the specification, it is not "wrong" (see below).

Besides it is more legible and universal to write code in English, are there any other reason to not use special characters in a C# source code?

Since you said "Besides", I'm not going to address the legibility nor "universality" topics (as is appropriate for a StackOverflow question anyways). To your other part: "are there any other reason to not use special characters"... Since I'm ignoring the first things you mentioned, I have to say I can't think of many. The only thing I can think of is; We still (amazingly) have problems with some tools supporting Unicode today (off-brand third party tools, mostly) it MAY be that you use some wacky tool which doesn't handle unicode correctly, or doesn't conform to the C# spec correctly - but I haven't come across any. So, I'd say no. (Keeping in mind you specifically said I didn't have to address to legibility or universality topics).


From the C# ECMA Specification Page 70:

The rules for identifiers given in this subclause correspond exactly to those recommended by the Unicode Standard Annex 15 except that underscore is allowed as an initial character (as is traditional in the C programming language), Unicode escape sequences are permitted in identifiers, and the “@” character is allowed as a prefix to enable keywords to be used as identifiers.

identifier:: 
    available-identifier
    @ identifier-or-keyword

available-identifier::
    An identifier-or-keyword that is not a keyword

identifier-or-keyword::
    identifier-start-character 
    identifier-part-charactersopt

identifier-start-character:: 
    letter-character
    _ (the underscore character U+005F)

identifier-part-characters::
    identifier-part-character
    identifier-part-characters
    identifier-part-character

identifier-part-character:: 
    letter-character
    decimal-digit-character 
    connecting-character 
    combining-character 
    formatting-character

letter-character::
    A Unicode character of classes Lu, Ll, Lt, Lm, Lo, or Nl
    A unicode-escape-sequence representing a character of classes Lu, Ll, Lt, Lm, Lo, or Nl

The important bit there is what the spec defined a letter-character as.

It specifically includes: A Unicode character of classes Lu, Ll, Lt, Lm, Lo, or Nl

The character you mention (ñ unicode reference) belongs to the category "Lu" (Letter, Uppercase) which is specifically allowed by the specification in an identifier.

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This doesn't answer the question... The OP isn't asking whether it is allowed (obviously it is), but whether it's wrong –  Thomas Levesque Jan 12 '12 at 15:48
    
If it's allowed by the specification then it's by definition not "wrong". Whether or not it's frowned upon is a matter of OPINION and that's not really suitable for a StackExchange question. Plus, that opinion will vary dramatically by locale and situation. –  Steve Jan 12 '12 at 15:50
    
If it's allowed by the specification then it's by definition not "wrong": I disagree... something can be a bad practice even if it's legal –  Thomas Levesque Jan 12 '12 at 15:53
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@ThomasLevesque Please see my edit. Also, we may be disagreeing over terms here. In my dictionary "wrong" has a very particular meaning - and that meaning doesn't generally fall into the prevue of opinion. Additionally, the OP specifically requested answers ignore the topics of readability, etc. –  Steve Jan 12 '12 at 16:00

Playing around at home, I'll often name Func parameters λ because it amuses me to do so.

For code anyone would see, I wouldn't make someone have a harder job typing just because it amuses me to use a non-Latin letter in a given case. That's not the place for such amusement.

With a perfectly normal Latin letter like ñ I'd have no qualms in using it if I had a good reason for using a loan-word that it's used in. That said, it's never come up. About the only loan-word with a diacritic I've ever used in coding is façade, but its been so long in use in a computing context and hence is so often seen in the form facade that I think of facade as a computing word derived from façade in much the same way I think of color as a computing word for colour despite the latter being the spelling used in the form of English I use, and hence would only ever use façade and colour in written English.

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+1 because of the façade computer science history! :) –  Rubens Mariuzzo Jan 20 '12 at 14:52
    
@RubensMariuzzo I think that comment says more about the ideolect that someone whose personal history involves a childhood split between literature and computer programming, than CS history :) –  Jon Hanna Jan 20 '12 at 14:58

I personally prefer when every piece of code/comment is written in English only. And English isn't my native language. I just think it's better for communication if everybody write code using the same language.

It's extremely painful when you have to translate - from a language you don't know a single word - variable names or comments around a piece of code you're debugging.

Another point is that the language itself is written in English.

Of course it's a personal preference.

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It's especially annoying when you have an identifier in a foreign language that you don't even know how to pronounce... –  Thomas Levesque Jan 12 '12 at 15:50
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@ThomasLevesque It's also annoying when you have an identifier in English that you don't even know how to pronounce :-) –  phoog Jan 12 '12 at 20:27

As long as it compiles I think it's OK to use, what people speaking English, calls special characters. I live in Sweden and here we have the characters ÅÄÖ which is nonexistent in English. Many people use ÅÄÖ in their programs to be able to write the program so a Swedish developer can understand. Sometimes there are words that have no good translation in English and then the Swedish word is more explanatory.

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