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For unit tests (using the unittest module) that use the App Engine testbed, I need setUp and tearDown methods to activate and deactivate the testbed, respectively (slightly simplified):

class SomeTest(unittest.TestCase):

  def setUp(self):
    self.testbed = testbed.Testbed()
    self.testbed.activate()

  def tearDown(self):
    self.testbed.deactivate()

  def testSomething(self):
    ...

This quickly becomes a burden to write. I could write a base class TestCaseWithTestbed, but then I'd have to remember to call the superclass method each time I need a custom setUp in one of the test cases.

I thought it would be more elegant to solve this with a class decorator instead. So I'd like to write:

@WithTestbed
class SomeTest(unittest.TestCase):

  def testSomething(self):
    ...

With this decorator applied, the testbed should just be activated magically. So... how to implement the WithTestbed decorator? I currently have the following:

def WithTestbed(cls):
  class ClsWithTestbed(cls):

    def setUp(self):
      self.testbed = testbed.Testbed()
      self.testbed.activate()
      cls.setUp(self)

    def tearDown(self):
      cls.tearDown(self)
      self.testbed.deactivate()

  return ClsWithTestbed

This works for simple cases, but has some serious problems:

  • The name of the test class becomes ClsWithTestbed and this shows up in the test output.
  • Concrete test classes calling super(SomeTestClass, self).setUp() end up in an infinite recursion, because SomeTestClass is now equal to WithTestbed.

I'm a bit hazy on Python's runtime type manipulation. So, how to do this the Right Way?

share|improve this question
1  
Aren't you just inheriting setUp? What's wrong with ordinary subclassing? Why mess with a decorator for that? –  S.Lott Jan 12 '12 at 15:45
    
If I have other setup tasks to do in specific test cases, I'd have to remember to call super(SomeTestCase, self).setUp(). That's ugly. –  Thomas Jan 12 '12 at 15:48
2  
It may be ugly, but it's the standard, common, normal, Pythonic approach. –  S.Lott Jan 12 '12 at 15:49
    
It's not common to have to do this in TestCases, though. It's easy to forget, because I just did :) –  Thomas Jan 12 '12 at 15:50
    
It's pretty common in my projects. We have many TestCases with similar initial configurations. It may be easy to forget, but a common setup is a Great Big Deal and having proper subclasses helps organize that. That's why the unittest framework was -- explicitly -- made a proper class hierarchy in the native language. So you can use the language (not a silly DSL or something else) to organize your testing. Simple inheritance is a very powerful tool. –  S.Lott Jan 12 '12 at 16:00

3 Answers 3

This appears to work and solve the problems:

def WithTestbed(cls):
  def DoNothing(self):
    pass

  orig_setUp = getattr(cls, 'setUp', DoNothing)
  orig_tearDown = getattr(cls, 'tearDown', DoNothing)

  def setUp(self):
    self.testbed = testbed.Testbed()
    self.testbed.activate()
    orig_setUp(self)
  def tearDown(self):
    orig_tearDown(self)
    self.testbed.deactivate()

  cls.setUp = setUp
  cls.tearDown = tearDown
  return cls

Does anyone see any problems with this approach?

share|improve this answer
1  
1) It obscures a proper class relationship with a decorator. 2) It makes ordinary subclass extensions nearly impossible to understand because it obscures simple inheritance. –  S.Lott Jan 12 '12 at 17:43
    
@S.Lott In a library I use, there is a class 'A' with subclasses B1, B2; in my application, C1 inherits B1 and C2 inherits B2, both of them need to override a method defined in A. In this case, a class decorator helps me reduce duplication. –  satoru Jan 10 at 3:15

Here's a simple way to do what you're asking with subclassing instead of a decorator:

class TestCaseWithTestBed(unittest.TestCase):

  def setUp(self):
    self.testbed = testbed.Testbed()
    self.testbed.activate()
    self.mySetUp()

  def tearDown(self):
    self.myTearDown()
    self.testbed.deactivate()

  def mySetUp(self): pass
  def myTearDown(self): pass

class SomeTest(TestCaseWithTestBed):
  def mySetUp(self):
    "Insert custom setup here"

All you have to do is define mySetUp and myTearDown in your test cases instead of setUp and tearDown.

share|improve this answer
    
Oooooh, I like this one. All the simplicity of inheritance without having to remember to call the superclass methods from the subclass ones. –  Robru Jun 24 '12 at 20:12

Something like this would work:

def WithTestbed(cls):
    cls._post_testbed_setUp = getattr(cls, 'setUp', lambda self : None)
    cls._post_testbed_tearDown = getattr(cls, 'tearDown', lambda self : None)

    def setUp(self):
        self.testbed = testbed.Testbed()
        self.testbed.activate()
        self._post_testbed_setUp()

    def tearDown(self):
        self.testbed.deactivate()
        self._post_testbed_tearDown()

    cls.setUp = setUp
    cls.tearDown = tearDown
    return cls

@WithTestbed
class SomeTest(object):
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
This will work in Python 3, where unbound methods are ordinary functions. In Python 2.x, you need to create method wrappers for the added functions. –  kindall Jan 12 '12 at 16:45
    
That would be the case if a method were being dynamically added to an instance, but here it is being added to a class which makes all the difference. Running the code you can verify that the methods are in fact bound. Here is a good post on the subject: stackoverflow.com/a/962966/224295 –  philofinfinitejest Jan 12 '12 at 17:16

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