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I'm looking for a generalized solution for this.

Consider 2 radio type inputs with the same name. When submitted, the one that is checked determines the value that gets sent with the form:

<input type="radio" name="myRadios" onchange="handleChange1();" value="1" />
<input type="radio" name="myRadios" onchange="handleChange2();" value="2" />

The change event does not fire when a radio button is de-selected. So if the radio with value="1" is already selected and the user selects the second, handleChange1() does not run. This presents a problem (for me anyway) in that there is no event where I can can catch this de-selection.

What I would like is a workaround for the onchange event for the checkbox group value or alternatively an oncheck event that detects not only when a radio is checked but also when it is unchecked.

I'm sure some of you have run into this problem before. What are some workarounds (or ideally what is the right way to handle this)? I just want to catch the change event, access the previously checked radio as well as the newly checked radio.

P.S.
onclick seems like a better (cross-browser) event to indicate when a radio is checked but it still does not solve the un-checked problem.

I suppose it makes sense why onchange for a checkbox type does work in a case like this since it changes the value that it submits when you check or un-check it. I wish the radio buttons behaved more like a SELECT element's onchange but what can you do...

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11 Answers 11

up vote 35 down vote accepted
+50
<form name="myForm">
            <input type="radio" name="myRadios"  value="1" />
            <input type="radio" name="myRadios"  value="2" />
        </form>

<script>
var rad = document.myForm.myRadios;
var prev = null;
for(var i = 0; i < rad.length; i++) {
    rad[i].onclick = function() {
        (prev)? console.log(prev.value):null;
        if(this !== prev) {
            prev = this;
        }
        console.log(this.value)
    };
}
</script>
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2  
Just a note on why I chose this as the correct answer: Click event handlers are set up on each of the radio buttons with the name attribute myRadios to read the variable prev which holds the currently selected radio. A comparison is done within each click handler to decide if the clicked radio is the same as the one stored in prev and if not then the currently clicked radio is stored there. Within the click handler, you have access to the previously selected: prev and the currently selected radio: this –  Matthew Apr 26 '12 at 12:05
6  
It would be better to cache the function outside the loop, so that all radios share the same event handler (now they have identical handlers but they are different functions). Or maybe put all radios inside a wrapper and use event delegation –  Oriol Aug 31 '13 at 19:01
    
I love this example, only comment to make it better would be to call rad radios. It is picky but rad(s) usually stands for radians in most scripts these days Except for that awesome job. –  Ash Blue Feb 3 at 2:41

I would make two changes:

<input type="radio" name="myRadios" onclick="handleClick(this);" value="1" />
<input type="radio" name="myRadios" onclick="handleClick(this);" value="2" />
  1. Use the onclick handler instead of onchange - you're changing the "checked state" of the radio input, not the value, so there's not a change event happening.
  2. Use a single function, and pass this as a parameter, that will make it easy to check which value is currently selected.

ETA: Along with your handleClick() function, you can track the original / old value of the radio in a page-scoped variable. That is:

var currentValue = 0;
function handleClick(myRadio) {
    alert('Old value: ' + currentValue);
    alert('New value: ' + myRadio.value);
    currentValue = myRadio.value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, though this doesn't address the issue of having to get the previous checked radio and you are also stating something that other users have already mentioned which is to use "onclick" instead of "onchange". I actually knew this from the beginning but I wanted to draw attention to the fact that onchange doesn't work as one might expect and I would like to handle it better. –  Matthew Jan 29 '12 at 18:14
    
You're using JavaScript, right? So why not just maintain a variable that stores the last known selected radio button? If you're using a single handler, then you can check for this stored value before you overwrite it with the new value. +1 –  jmort253 Jan 29 '12 at 18:25
4  
@Matthew: The onclick handler is just named poorly -- it handles the event of radio button selection whether the button is clicked, touched, or activated by hitting "enter" on a keyboard. The onchange handler is not appropriate in this case since the value of the input does not change, only the checked/unchecked attribute. I've added an example script to address the previous value. –  Nate Cook Feb 15 '12 at 21:41

As you can see from this example: http://jsfiddle.net/UTwGS/

both the click and change events are fired when selecting a radio button option (at least in some browsers).

I should also point out that in my example the click event is still fired when you use tab and the keyboard to select an option.

So, my point is that even though the change event is fired is some browsers, the click event should supply the coverage you need.

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Your jsfiddle causes an error in IE7 when you click a radio. –  Matthew Jan 12 '12 at 21:39
1  
Yes, because there is a console.log statement in my code, which IE7 doesn't support. You could just alert it in IE if you wanted. –  Philip Walton Jan 12 '12 at 22:41
    
Thanks. This doesn't address how to get the previously selected checkbox though. Also thanks, I didn't know console.log didn't work in IE. –  Matthew Jan 29 '12 at 18:17
    
Don't double up on event handlers -- in browsers that fire both the click and change event handlers, you'll end up calling the handler twice. In this case, since @Matthew is concerned with the previous value, that could lead to bad consequences. –  Nate Cook Feb 15 '12 at 21:43
    
@NateCook you clearly missed the point of my example. I was showing that any time the change event is fired, the click event is also fired. Just because I was using both events in my example does not mean I was promoting it. I think your down-vote was undeserved. –  Philip Walton Feb 16 '12 at 2:55

As you can see here: http://www.w3schools.com/jsref/event_onchange.asp The onchange attribute is not supported for radio buttons.

The first SO question linked by you gives you the answer: Use the onclick event instead and check the radio button state inside of the function it triggers.

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This is just a bit incomplete. So, after creating a function to handle all the clicks in the group, how would you check to see which one has been deselected? Also, I am looking for a non-jquery solution. –  Matthew Jan 12 '12 at 16:46
1  
onclick is not the same semantic, as you can change the checkedness of a radio button through keyboard input given keyboard form selection being enabled. –  gsnedders Jan 22 '12 at 18:57
4  
This has too many upvotes. –  Matthew Jan 28 '12 at 14:31
1  
w3schools for 1 and didn't address the whole problem for 2 which was how to get the previously selected radio. 2 was the most important part of the question in my mind. –  Matthew Jan 28 '12 at 23:37
2  
+1 more upvote because it's using w3schools. –  jmort253 Jan 29 '12 at 18:23

Yes there is no change event for currently selected radio button. But problem is when each radio button is taken as a separate element. Instead a radio group should be considered a single element like select. So change event is triggered for that group. If it is a select element we never worry about each option in it, but take only the selected option. We store the current value in a variable which will become the previous value, when a new option is selected. Similarly you have to use a separate variable for storing value of checked radio button.

If you want to identify the previous radio button, you have to loop on mousedown event.

var radios = document.getElementsByName("myRadios");
var val;
for(var i = 0; i < radios.length; i++){
    if(radios[i].checked){
        val = radios[i].value;
    }
}

see this : http://jsfiddle.net/diode/tywx6/2/

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I thought about using mousedown to check before click happened but that won't work when using space to select the radio. Maybe the focus event in place of or in addition to what you mentioned. –  Matthew Jan 12 '12 at 17:56

Store the previous checked radio in a variable:
http://jsfiddle.net/dsbonev/C5S4B/

HTML

<input type="radio" name="myRadios" value="1" /> 1
<input type="radio" name="myRadios" value="2" /> 2
<input type="radio" name="myRadios" value="3" /> 3
<input type="radio" name="myRadios" value="4" /> 4
<input type="radio" name="myRadios" value="5" /> 5

JS

var changeHandler = (function initChangeHandler() {
    var previousCheckedRadio = null;

    var result = function (event) {
        var currentCheckedRadio = event.target;
        var name = currentCheckedRadio.name;

        if (name !== 'myRadios') return;

        //using radio elements previousCheckedRadio and currentCheckedRadio

        //storing radio element for using in future 'change' event handler
        previousCheckedRadio = currentCheckedRadio;
    };

    return result;
})();

document.addEventListener('change', changeHandler, false);

JS EXAMPLE CODE

var changeHandler = (function initChangeHandler() {
    var previousCheckedRadio = null;

    function logInfo(info) {
        if (!console || !console.log) return;

        console.log(info);
    }

    function logPrevious(element) {
        if (!element) return;

        var message = element.value + ' was unchecked';

        logInfo(message);
    }

    function logCurrent(element) {
        if (!element) return;

        var message = element.value + ' is checked';

        logInfo(message);
    }

    var result = function (event) {
        var currentCheckedRadio = event.target;
        var name = currentCheckedRadio.name;

        if (name !== 'myRadios') return;

        logPrevious(previousCheckedRadio);
        logCurrent(currentCheckedRadio);

        previousCheckedRadio = currentCheckedRadio;
    };

    return result;
})();

document.addEventListener('change', changeHandler, false);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I might take the fiddle even a bit further and store the radio itself. This way when the value changes, you have a reference to the previously selected radio rather than just it's value. –  Matthew Jan 24 '12 at 14:31
    
@Matthew Actually the fiddle that I shared was storing the radio element and not the value only. The value was logged to show the purpose of the code but it was not stored for later usage. I'm editing the variable names to become more clarified: previousChecked -> previousCheckedRadio, that -> currentCheckedRadio; –  Dimitar Bonev Jan 24 '12 at 17:49
    
Thanks. This is a good solution except for using the change event which doesn't behave properly cross-browser. If you used click instead it would be better. –  Matthew Jan 29 '12 at 18:02

I realize this is an old issue, but this snippet of code works for me. Perhaps someone in the future will find it useful:

<h2>Testing radio functionality</h2>
<script type="text/javascript">var radioArray=[null];</script>
<input name="juju" value="button1" type="radio" onclick="radioChange('juju','button1',radioArray);" />Button 1
<input name="juju" value="button2" type="radio" onclick="radioChange('juju','button2',radioArray);" />Button 2
<input name="juju" value="button3" type="radio" onclick="radioChange('juju','button3',radioArray);" />Button 3
<br />

<script type="text/javascript">
function radioChange(radioSet,radioButton,radioArray)
  {
  //if(radioArray instanceof Array) {alert('Array Passed');}
  var oldButton=radioArray[0];
  if(radioArray[0] == null)
    {
    alert('Old button was not defined');
    radioArray[0]=radioButton;
    }
  else
    {
    alert('Old button was set to ' + oldButton);
    radioArray[0]=radioButton;
    }
  alert('New button is set to ' + radioArray[0]);
  }
</script>
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If you add onkeydown="radioChange('juju','button1',radioArray);" you could also capture when a user uses space to check the radio. –  Matthew Sep 3 '12 at 11:58

This is just off the top of my head, but you could do an onClick event for each radio button, give them all different IDs, and then make a for loop in the event to go through each radio button in the group and find which is was checked by looking at the 'checked' attribute. The id of the checked one would be stored as a variable, but you might want to use a temp variable first to make sure that the value of that variable changed, since the click event would fire whether or not a new radio button was checked.

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I don't think there is any way other then storing the previous state. Here is the solution with jQuery

<script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.1/jquery.min.js"></script> 
<script type="text/javascript">
    var lastSelected;
    $(function () {
        //if you have any radio selected by default
        lastSelected = $('[name="myRadios"]:checked').val();
    });
    $(document).on('click', '[name="myRadios"]', function () {
        if (lastSelected != $(this).val() && typeof lastSelected != "undefined") {
            alert("radio box with value " + $('[name="myRadios"][value="' + lastSelected + '"]').val() + " was deselected");
        }
        lastSelected = $(this).val();
    });
</script>

<input type="radio" name="myRadios" value="1" />
<input type="radio" name="myRadios" value="2" />
<input type="radio" name="myRadios" value="3" />
<input type="radio" name="myRadios" value="4" />
<input type="radio" name="myRadios" value="5" />

After thinking about it a bit more, I decided to get rid of the variable and add/remove class. Here is what I got: http://jsfiddle.net/BeQh3/2/

share|improve this answer
    
I thought about using a jQuery and there is definitely alot more that could be done with it. You could bind some custom events for checked and unchecked and even check for cross browser quirks. Sounds like a good idea for a plugin. –  Matthew Jan 28 '12 at 14:27
    
Thanks. I like jQuery but it is unavailable to me in this case. –  Matthew Jan 29 '12 at 18:08
    
How is jQuery unavailable to you? –  jmort253 Jan 29 '12 at 18:21
    
If jQuery were unavailable to me, I'd find a different job. –  Adrian Carr Jun 6 '13 at 15:08
<input type="radio" name="brd" onclick="javascript:brd();" value="IN">   
<input type="radio" name="brd" onclick="javascript:brd();" value="EX">` 
<script type="text/javascript">
  function brd() {alert($('[name="brd"]:checked').val());}
</script>
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So I made this fiddle which shows the solution: http://jsfiddle.net/R6w7m/

The problem is getting the previously selected radio and being able to call an event on it and I felt most of the answers have been incomplete. Now that I have had some time, I was able to come up with a solution that I think should work for just about anyone who runs into this.

Using mousedown and keydown events, I was able to get the previously selected radio before the onclick event fires weather it is selected with the keyboard or mouse.

Notes:
Each click event has a specific event handler function and calls onuncheck for the previously selected radio. One could take the onuncheck further and handle each radio case separately but I am just outputting the value. If you wanted to get fancy you could add a custom oncheck attribute to your radio and have onuncheck call it but this is technically against the rules.

Tested and works in Firefox, IE7 and up, Chrome, and Safari (still working on a mobile solution)

Update:
I am actually really glad for your comment @Matthew Patrick Cashatt otherwise I wouldn't have gotten around to thanking @Michal for his answer and subsequently trying to find the problem I thought I had with it. There is none - it seems to work fine in Firefox, IE7 and up, Chrome, and Safari anyway which is what my solution does. Michal's solution gets the bounty and I should think... more upvotes since it currently has 0.

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1  
Consider adding a comment if you are going to downvote. Is there a problem with this solution? –  Matthew Jan 28 '12 at 16:55
1  
I am not the down-voter (and yes, they should have left a comment), but if I had to guess, I would say that some one felt like you capitalized on their work and then didn't award the bounty. I would also point out that it is curious you aren't using jQuery, for it holds solutions for this that are MUCH more elegant; for example, a single click event handler for inputs of the same name that logs the clicked radio buttons, in sequence, in a JS object. At any rate, good luck and don't forget to say 'thanks' to each of the folks that helped you out ;). –  Matthew Patrick Cashatt Jan 29 '12 at 17:37
    
@Matthew Patrick Cashatt Thanks –  Matthew Jan 29 '12 at 17:45
    
You can still unaccept this answer and award the bounty to the person who helped you the most. There are 37 minutes left so it's not too late. Also, I think bounty can be awarded separately from accepted answer. –  jmort253 Jan 29 '12 at 18:20

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