Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have something that should be really simple, but it's killing me.

l = LineItem.first
#<LineItem id: 5, product_id: 1, quantity: 1, price: #<BigDecimal:7f7fdb51a3f8,'0.999E3',9(18)>, cart_id: 5, discount_percentage: 10, discount_amount: nil, discount_active: true, created_at: "2012-01-12 16:17:41", updated_at: "2012-01-12 16:17:41">

I have

l.discount_percentage.blank?
=> false

So, I have the following method:

  def total_price
    discount_amount = 0 if discount_amount.blank?
    discount_percentage = 0 if discount_percentage.blank?

    discounted_amount_from_percent = price*(discount_percentage.to_f/100)

    applicable_discount = [discount_amount,discounted_amount_from_percent].max

    return (price-applicable_discount)
  end

But when I do this:

l.total_price

Instead of returning 899, it returns 999 (meaning that the if discount_percentage.blank? didn't work at all!)

Or the syntax WHATEVER_HERE if true/false only work in the View on Rails??

share|improve this question
    
The postfix conditional (do_something if condition) is valid Ruby syntax, and isn't restricted to the view. –  MrTheWalrus Jan 12 '12 at 16:48
1  
What happens if you use self.discount_percentage instead? –  Dave Newton Jan 12 '12 at 16:53
    
Dave, that works, but the issue is: If price is accessible without the self.price, why I need to have self on discount_amount and discount_percentage??? –  Chim Kan Jan 12 '12 at 16:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here lays the problem:

discount_amount = 0 if discount_amount.blank?
discount_percentage = 0 if discount_percentage.blank?

Ruby "sees" variables from top to bottom and from left to right, so in that line he first sees a local variable (discount_amount =) so he decides this discount_amount thing in discount_mount.blank? is that same local variable (and not the instance method. You think the variable is not defined yet, but Ruby has already spotted it). Not having any value yet, discount_amountit set to default value nil, so nil.blank? succeeds and the assignment discount_percentage = 0 is made. Ditto for discount_percentage. Here's a demo snippet:

class ExampleClass 
  def run
    x = "it works as expected" if x == "x"
    x
  end

  def run2
    if x == "x"
      x = "it works as expected" 
    end
    x
  end

  def run3
    xy = "it works as expected" if x == "x"
    xy
  end

  def x; "x"; end
end

p ExampleClass.new.run #=> nil
p ExampleClass.new.run2 #=> "it works as expected"
p ExampleClass.new.run3 #=> "it works as expected"

Step 1: don't use the same names for local variables and instance methods. That's usually a bad idea anyway because you lose track of which one you are using, but in this case it has really bitten you.

Step 2: Do not write imperative code when you're doing math calculations! Really, maths (9X % of the things you do in a typical application, (10-X)% being unavoidable side-effects) play well with expressions, not with statements. I'd write:

def total_price
  final_discount_amount = discount_amount || 0
  final_discount_percentage = discount_percentage || 0
  discounted_amount_from_percent = price * (final_discount_percentage.to_f/100)
  applicable_discount = [final_discount_amount, discounted_amount_from_percent].max
  price - applicable_discount
end
share|improve this answer
1  
Your explanation is EXCELLENT. The method is much cleaner. But I'm a beginner that's why my methods are all imperative including the calcs. It's closer to human language. –  Chim Kan Jan 13 '12 at 20:09

When using attribute writers (e.g foo = ...), you should use self explicitly. This is nicely explained here.

So your code should be like this:

 def total_price
    self.discount_amount = 0 if discount_amount.blank?
    self.discount_percentage = 0 if discount_percentage.blank?

    # local var, self not necessary
    discounted_amount_from_percent = price*(discount_percentage.to_f/100)

    # local var, self not necessary
    applicable_discount = [discount_amount,discounted_amount_from_percent].max

    return (price-applicable_discount)
  end

This is also explained in the Programming Ruby book:

Why did we write self.leftChannel in the example on page 74? Well, there's a hidden gotcha with writable attributes. Normally, methods within a class can invoke other methods in the same class and its superclasses in functional form (that is, with an implicit receiver of self). However, this doesn't work with attribute writers. Ruby sees the assignment and decides that the name on the left must be a local variable, not a method call to an attribute writer.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.